Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Sample Chapter - Short History of Indiana's Historic Markers - Claude R. Wickard

Sample Chapter
Short History of Indiana's Historic Markers 
Claude R. Wickard
Location: 
Carroll White REMC, 241 N. Heartland Dr., Delphi (Carroll County, IN) 46923. [South of the Hoosier Heartland (Highway 25) about one mile in the Hoosier Heartland Industrial Park.]
Installed:
2018 Indiana Historical Bureau, Carroll County Historical Society, Carroll White REMC, and Friends and Family of Claude R. Wickard.
ID#: 08.2018.1
Text
Side One
 Claude R. Wickard
1893-1967
 Agricultural leader Claude Wickard was born on a farm near here, which he maintained throughout his career. He graduated from Purdue University, became a local Farm Bureau leader, and in 1932 was elected to the Indiana Senate. During the 1930s, Wickard advanced through the Agricultural Adjustment Administration, a New Deal agency aimed at creating parity for farmers.
 Side Two
 By 1937, Wickard became a leader within the U.S. Department of Agriculture. After President Franklin Roosevelt appointed him Secretary of Agriculture in 1940, Wickard ensured the agricultural production necessary for Allied victory in WWII. In 1945, he became chief of the Rural Electrification Administration, which increased farmers’ production and standard of living.

Short History by the Author
Claude R. Wickard (February 28, 1893 – April 29, 1967)
The son of Andrew Jackson and Iva Lenora Kirkpatrick Wickard, Claude was native to Campden, Indiana. He enrolled in Purdue University in 1910, however he had to delay his studies when his father became ill in 1911. He completed the planting and returned to Purdue after harvesting the corn. After graduating in 1915 he returned to the family farm. He became associated with the Democratic Party and the New Deal policies of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Rising to prominence in the party, coupled with his success as a farmer, he gained election to the Indiana Senate in 1932. His progressive farming methods led to his appointment as Undersecretary of Agriculture under Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace. Wallace resigned to run for Vice President in 1940. Wickard became the Secretary of Agriculture after Wallace's resignation. During World War II he headed the War Food Administration and used the position to help farmers aid the war effort with increased food production. In 1945 Wickard gained appointment as the head of the Rural Electrification Administration, a position he held until 1953. He resigned that year to run for the United States Senate. Republican Homer E. Capehart defeated him in the election. Wickard died in an automobile accident on April 29, 1967. He is interred at Maple Lawn Cemetery in Flora, Indiana.


Monday, December 2, 2019

Sample Chapter -Benjamin Parke

Sample Chapter
Benjamin Parke
Indiana's Counties
Parke County in Indiana derives its name from Benjamin Parke.
Benjamin Parke (September 2, 1777 - July 12, 1835) 
A native of New Jersey, Parke's education was scanty as a child. At twenty years old, he moved to Lexington, Kentucky where he studied law with local attorney James Brown. Two years later, in 1799, he moved to Vincennes, Indiana. A supporter of Indiana Territorial Governor William Henry Harrison, he received an appointment as Attorney General of the Indiana Territory. His term, from 1804 through 1808, coincided with his service as Territorial Delegate to Congress from 1805 to 1808. Parke commanded an Indiana Light Dragoons at the 1811 Battle of Tippecanoe. Harrison included him on his staff during the War of 1812. During his service, he rose to the rank of colonel. After the war, he attended the state constitutional convention in 1816 as a representative of Knox County. After statehood, Parke represented the United States at the Treaty of St. Mary's in 1818. He also served as the first president of the Indiana Historical Society when it formed on December 11, 1830. President James Monroe appointed him to the United States District Court for the District of Indiana. He held that position until his death in 1835.

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

Choosing the Garden Site

choosing, garden, site, location
Choosing the Garden Site
Sample Chapter 
Gardener's Guide to the Raised Garden Bed
Choosing the Garden Site
Most vegetables require a minimum of six to eight hours of direct sunshine, good airflow and good drainage. Choose a site that will provide those conditions when planning your garden. Good airflow is also important to help prevent fungal diseases. Ideally, it should also be near a water source to make irrigation easier. The garden tool storage shed should also be nearby, if possible. Placing the garden near the home, if it can be done without the home shading the garden, is also desirable. This is especially true if it can be near the kitchen. Planting near black walnut trees is generally not recommended, as the tree produces a substance called juglone, which is toxic to most of the plants you want to grow. Every part, roots, leaves and nuts, contain this substance, so make sure you do not use walnut leaves as a mulch in the garden. 

Gardener's Guide to the Raised Garden Bed

raised, bed, garden, guide
Gardener's Guide to the Raised Garden Bed

Sample Chapter 1

Description:
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Friday, November 22, 2019

Sample Chapter - Short History of Museums - Teylers Museum

Sample Chapter 
Short History of Museums
Teylers Museum
Dutch merchant Pieter Teyler van der Hulst passed away in 1778 leaving his fortune for the advancement of religion, art, and science. Dutch architect and engineer Leendert Viervant opened an art and book room the next year which became known as the Oval Room. During the ensuing decades the museum grew, becoming Teylers First Painting Gallery in 1838. The facility expanded again in 1885 with the addition of the Instrument Room, and Fossil Room I and later Fossil Room II. The next addition came in 2002 with the addition of the museum shop and multimedia room. Teylers Museum is the Netherlands’s oldest and largest museum.
The Museum
The museum's collection includes Art, books, instruments, coins and medals. Visitors can also visit the museum shop and museum café.
Fossils and Minerals
Teylers Museum 
Spaarne 16 2011
CH Haarlem
Telephone 023 516 0960
info@teylersmuseum.nl

Sunday, November 17, 2019

Girl Scout Troop 40180' Sunday Shopping


Come out and support the Girl Scouts and shop all the wonderful merchants.
Buy a book.

Sunday Shopping
Sunday, November 24, 2019 at 12 PM – 5 PM
Dearborn County Fairgrounds
Abner Hall
351 E. Eads Parkwaykwy
Lawrenceburg In 47025

Monday, November 11, 2019

Sample Chapter - Short History of Gardening and Agriculture - George Washington Carver

Sample Chapter 
Short History of Gardening and Agriculture
George Washington Carver (c. 1864 - January 5, 1943)
The son of slaves Mary and Giles, George’s parents was the property of Moses and Susan Carver who lived in Diamond, Missouri. While an infant, slave raiders from Arkansas kidnapped George, his mother and sister. They were sold somewhere in Kentucky. Moses Giles hired an agent to find them; however the agent only located George, whom he returned to the Carver's. The ending of the Civil War in April 1865 ended the practice of slavery. The Giles kept George and his brother to raise in their home. The two could not attend public school, as they were black. Susan took their education upon herself, teaching the boys to read and write.
Further Education
George decided to continue his quest for education by attending a high school that taught black children in Neosho, Missouri, about ten miles from his home in Diamond. During the years before attending this school he had identified himself as Carver's George. While attending this school, he became known as George Carver. He attended a series of schools, eventually earning a high school diploma at Minneapolis High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
College
After Highland University in Arkansas denied him admission because he was black, after they had previously admitted him, he farmed a seventeen acre farm and earned extra money by performing odd jobs. Simpson College eventually admitted him. A skilled painter of plants and flowers, his art teacher encouraged him to attend Iowa State Agricultural College. He became the first black student in the school in 1891. He received a bachelor's degree in 1894 and a master's degree in 1896. He remained at Iowa State as the school's first black professor. During his tenure he gained a reputation as a skilled botanist and researcher. 
Tuskegee Institute
Founder of Tuskegee Institute Booker T. Washington hired Carver to head up its agricultural department in 1896. Carver's goal was to improve the condition of poor farmers who had to farm lands exhausted by extensive cotton farming. During his time at Tuskegee Carver authored numerous agricultural bulletins which he distributed to these farmers. He encouraged a crop rotation of peanuts, sweet potatoes and soy beans. In 1906 he received funding to develop a mobile agricultural educational center from New York financier Morris Ketchum Jesup. He called his innovation the Jessup Wagon and used the mobile classroom to teach better farming methods to farmers.
Later Achievements
His reputation as a researcher and teacher brought him admission to the British Royal Society of Arts and the admiration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Mahatma Gandhi. A staunch advocate of planting peanuts, the United Peanut Associations of America invited him to address their annual convention in 1920. He testified before the United States Congress at their behest in 1921. He authored several more agricultural bulletins, wrote a syndicated newspaper columnist and conducted agricultural speeches during the remainder of his life. He passed away on January 5, 1943 after suffering injuries during a fall in his home. His grave is adjacent to Booker T. Washington at Tuskegee University. 

Monday, November 4, 2019

A History of Indiana Libraries - Ripley County Edition



Description:
The Short History of Libraries, Printing and Language relates the story of printing, language, books, writing and libraries. Learn about the development of ink, papyrus, parchment, paper and the story of Johannes Gutenberg’s printing press. This Ripley County Edition relates the history of early Indiana libraries, the Indiana State Library and Indiana library laws. It includes the libraries of Ripley County, Batesville, Milan, Versailles and Osgood.

Preview Chapter
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Softbound Price - $9.99

Other Books in the Series
A History of Indiana Libraries - Ripley County Edition
Indiana Fire Departments - Ripley County Edition

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The Bookshelf
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Batesville, IN 47006

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bookshelf101@hotmail.com
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Friday, November 1, 2019

Sample Chapter - An American Revolution Time Line - 1776 May 11, 1776 - Washington Recommends Raising German Companies

Sample Chapter
An American Revolution Time Line - 1776
May 11, 1776 - Washington Recommends Raising German Companies
Rumors had reached Congress and General Washington on about the impending arrival of German mercenaries hired by the British to fight against the rebelling American colonies. On May 11, 1776 Washington dispatched a letter to John Hancock, President of the Continental Congress, in which he informs him that he has received no further intelligence on the arrival of German troops. In the letter, Washington recommends that Congress, "lest the account of their coming be true, may it not be advisable and good policy to raise some companies of our Germans to send among them when they arrive, for exciting a spirit of disaffection and desertion. If a few trusty, sensible fellows could get with them, . . . they would have great weight and influence with the common Soldiery, who certainly have no enmity towards us, having received no Injury, nor cause of Quarrell from us."
Germans in America
At the time of the Revolution Germans represented about ten percent of the population. These German residents found America an ideal place to settle, as they could own land and form businesses free of the noble class in their native lands that continually oppressed them. The Germans had settled mainly in Pennsylvania and Virginia; however they were present in other colonies as well. They tended concentrate themselves in their own community and continued to speak their own language and continue their own customs. Germans in America had proven to be ardent supporters of the Revolutionary movement and had participated in the conflict since the opening days of fighting. Pennsylvania had recruited four companies of exclusively German sharpshooters.

Thursday, October 31, 2019

Sample Chapter - A Timeline of Indiana History - 1795 - 1800 April 1796 - Chillicothe Ohio Established

Sample Chapter
A Timeline of Indiana History - 1795 - 1800
April 1796 - Chillicothe Ohio Established
Located on the Scioto River, the site is situated in south central Ohio and was part of the Virginia Military District. The name Chillicothe derives from a Shawnee word Chala•ka•tha, which means "principal town." The Shawnee tribe moved to the site in 1758 after a flood destroyed their village of Shannoah, or Sonnontio, also on the Scioto River. After the Treaty of Greeneville the area was opened for white settlement and the Shawnee had to leave.
Nathanial Massie (December 28, 1763 - November 03, 1813)
The son of Nathaniel and Elizabeth Watkins Massie, Nathanial was native to Goochland County, Virginia. Nathaniel served in the Revolutionary War. In 1783 he migrated to Kentucky to farm land his father owned. Massie had studied surveying and began exploring lands north of the Ohio River in the Virginia Military District of the Northwest Territory.
Virginia Military District 
During the period when the United States was attempting to establish a national government Virginia controlled most of the land in the Ohio River Valley. Maryland refused to ratify the Articles of Confederation unless Virginia ceded this vast region to the Federal government. Virginia did cede the land, but kept a large tract located in what is now south central Ohio to use to pay its Revolutionary War Veterans.
Surveying the Land
Many of the Revolutionary War veterans hired him to survey lands they received as grants for their war service. In 1790 Massie surveyed Manchester, along the Ohio River. During his survey work, Massie selected the best lands and bartered them for his surveying work. Thus, Massie acquired significant land holdings in what would become Chillicothe and Ross County, Ohio. Massie placed advertisements in various Kentucky and Virginia newspaper. He offered free lots in the new town to the first 100 settlers that migrated with him to the Northwest Territory. By March 1796 he had attracted about forty men bent of settling in the newly opened lands.
Chillicothe
Massie led this group up the Scioto River to settle at a point where Paint Creek empties into the Scioto River on April 1. He named the new town Prairie Station.  This site proved unsuitable, as it was low lying and subject to flooding. Thus, the settlers moved further upstream to the site of the former Shawnee town and began clearing land for their new settlement. The pioneers called the new town Massieville; however Massie changed the name to Chillicothe. The original plat had 456 lots. By late in the year the new town had taverns, stores and tradesman's shops. The town would later become the capital of the Northwest Territory and then the first capital of the new state of Ohio. Massie would settle in the town. He is interred in Grandview Cemetery, Chillicothe in Ross County, Ohio.

Monday, October 28, 2019

Short History of Museums


Short History of Museums

Description:
Publishing Date to be Announced
Preview Chapter 1
Preview Chapter 2
Buy Direct from Author
Softbound Price - $

Other Books in the Series

Available In Multiple Formats - Ebook And Softbound:
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The Bookshelf
101 N Walnut St,
Batesville, IN 47006

(812) 934-5800
bookshelf101@hotmail.com
Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
Mossyfeetbooks@gmail.com
Orders over $50.00 Free Shipping
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© 2019 Paul Wonning

Sample Chapter - Short History of Museums - Capitoline Museums

Sample Chapter 
Short History of Museums
Capitoline Museums

Pope Sixtus IV donated several bronze statues to the city of Rome in 1471, placing the collection on Capitoline Hill. The museum, still in existence and open to the public, claims the status of the oldest museum in the world. The collection of artifacts and art grew over the years to include ancient Roman statues, inscriptions, art, jewels and other historic artifacts. Pope Clement XII opened the museum to the public in 1734. The museum includes three main buildings linked by an underground gallery that passes under the piazza. Visitors will find a restaurant on the top level that provides a magnificent vista of Rome

Musei Capitolini
Piazza del Campidoglio 1
Capitoline Hill
00186 Roma.
Telephone +39 060608
http://www.museicapitolini.org/en/

Sunday, October 27, 2019

Greenwood Mall Book Show

Greenwood Mall Book Show
Greenwood Mall Book Show
1251 US-31 N
Greenwood, IN 46142
Saturday, November 30 - 9:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Sunday, December 1 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday, December 8 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday, December 15 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday, December 1 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday, December 1 8:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Sunday, December 29 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Indianapolis Christmas Gift and Hobby Show


Wednesday, November 6
Thursday November 7
Friday, November 8
Saturday, November 9 2019 
10:00 AM - 8:00 PM 
All three days
Indianapolis Christmas Gift and Hobby Show
Indiana State Fairgrounds
https://christmasgiftandhobbyshow.com

Some pics from the event









Thursday, October 17, 2019

Sample Chapter - Short History of Gardening and Agriculture - Steam Powered Farm Equipment

Sample Chapter 
Short History of Gardening and Agriculture 
Steam Powered Farm Equipment
Steam Engines
Thomas Aveling modified a Clayton & Shuttleworth portable steam engine in 1859, creating a self propelled machine that ranks as one of the world's first agricultural tractors. Aveling, and other tinkerers, experimented with the design of the machine over the next several years. By the beginning of the 1870's the shape of the tractor had been developed. The familiar four wheeled design remained dominant for the next several decades. These tractors packed a lot power for tasks like plowing and threshing wheat. The main drawbacks were that they were slow, heavy and hard to maneuver. The heavy machines frequently broke bridges down. They took a skilled operator as if improperly operated they would explode causing death and injury.
Thomas Aveling (September 11, 1824 - March 7, 1882)
The son of Thomas Aveling and Ann Aveling, Thomas was native to Fenland District, Cambridgeshire, Great Britain. His father died when he was young, after which the family migrated to Hoo. There his mother married Rev. John D'Urban. His father apprenticed him to a local farmer, Edward Lake. Aveling married D'Urban's daughter, Sarah. The couple would have six children. Aveling acquired a farm and operated a drainage tile business. In 1859 he modified a Clayton & Shuttleworth portable engine by attaching a long chain between he crankshaft of the engine and the rear axle. This machine became the nucleus of the traction engine that would evolve into the modern farm tractor. Many regard him as the "the father of the traction engine." He invented the steam roller and, along with Richard Thomas Porter founded the Aveling & Porter Company to manufacture steam rollers.
Threshing Machine
The threshing machine performed the work of the flail in threshing wheat. The mechanized thresher separated wheat grain from the straw and chaff in a series of steps. The farmer first fed the bundles of straw into a hopper on the machine. The bundles went into the separator, which was a series of rapidly rotating blades. These blades tore the bundle apart by cutting the twine that held them together and beat the grains from the heads without crushing the grains. The wheat then passed through a series of successively smaller screens that separated the straw and chaff from the wheat grain. The grain fell into a hopper where it was measured and dumped in a sack. The straw and chaff blew onto a nearby straw stack.
Threshing Rings
The mechanical thresher first appeared in 1837 when Hiram A. and John A. Pitts, Winthrop, Maine patented a horse powered threshing machine. This machine remained basically unchanged when steam powered engines first began appearing on farms around the beginning of the Twentieth Century. The threshing machine cost about $4,000 at this time, a substantial sum of money that was out of range of most farmers. Generally, a group of about six to eight farmers pooled their resources and purchased a machine. They would then pay for maintanence costs of the machine as a group. Each farm furnished a team of horses for each 40 acres to be threshed. After the threshing season concluded, the farmers held a meeting to settle accounts and lay plans for the next year.
The Women
While the men worked the threshing machines the women cooked and served the meals. Generally, the women began preparing for the day a week or so ahead of time. Other farm wives in the ring came to help out. On threshing day, the women served three meals, a morning and afternoon lunch and dinner at noon. The lunches consisted of meat and cheese sandwiches, cookies, and lemonade or water. Dinner was usually pan-fried chicken, beef and gravy, mashed potatoes, coleslaw, salads, sliced tomatoes, green beans, corn and other garden vegetables, relishes and pickles, bread or biscuits, along with pies, cakes and puddings. The reader must bear in mind that the quantity of food consumed by a band of hungry men was immense and the women worked without the benefit of air conditioning, refrigeration or modern cooking ranges. They had to carry water into the kitchen from the well in buckets and cook on either wood or coal cook stoves.
The Meals
When the women signaled that the food was ready, the steam engine operator blew the whistle on the steam engine, signaling that work would stop. The men washed their hands at the well or wash basins the women had placed nearby. The women generally brought the food into the fields, or alternately, in a spot near the barn. They women served the food on long tables made from planks. They used china, silverware and glasses. If the farm was large and required more than one day to thresh the grain, this process would repeat until it was done. Typically, the other wives in the ring would help wash the dishes and silverware. At the conclusion of the meal, the steam operator blew the whistle, signaling that work was to begin again.
Once one farm was done, the threshing crew moved to the next farm.

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Sample Chapter - An American Revolution Time Line - 1776 - Alexander Hamilton Writes Congress Demanding More Pay for his Troops

Sample Chapter
An American Revolution Time Line - 1776
May 02, 1776 - Alexander Hamilton Writes Congress Demanding More Pay for his Troops
Alexander Hamilton's artillery company was under staffed and underpaid. On May 2, Hamilton tried to rectify both situations by writing the New York Provincial Congress a letter in which he compared the pay rates of other artillery companies with his own. The letter stated:
“You will discover a considerable difference. My own pay will remain the same as it is now, but I make this application on behalf of the company, as I am fully convinced such a disadvantageous distinction will have a very pernicious effect on the minds and behavior of the men. They do the same duty with the other companies and think themselves entitled to the same pay.”
The Congress complied with his request. The number of enlisted men rose to 69 which was twice as many as he needed.

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Sample Chapter - A Timeline of Indiana History - 1795 - 1800 - August 07, 1795 – Greenville Treaty Copies Distributed

Sample Chapter
A Timeline of Indiana History - 1795 - 1800
August 07, 1795 – Greenville Treaty Copies Distributed
General Wayne opened the council by passing the calumet of peace to all the chiefs represented. After all had smoked, he passed copies of the treaty, along with the quill pen used by the chief to sign it, to each of the nations assembled. He instructed them to keep the "instrument of writing," and the copy of the treaty to pass along to their children, who would in turn pass it on to their children. He told them to keep in remembrance of the day the Fifteen Fires gave them peace and took them under its protection.
He next admonished them for two incidents that threatened to mar their good work. Someone had stolen the horse of a French trader that had accompanied them. Wayne told the chiefs that they must keep their young men under control. He informed them that a family of settlers that had thought they were safe during the negotiations had been murdered in their cabins the day before. He warned them that they must control themselves lest those seeking vengeance on the slain come into their territory and slay the wrong Indians in retribution.
The general next told them that gift distribution would begin the next day and would proceed in order of the tribes that signed the treaty. The Wyandotte had signed first, thus would receive their first. He assured them that it made no difference who received their gifts first; all would receive them as they became available.
Tarke next rose to praise those assembled for the good work they had concluded and to thank the Great Spirit for appointing this day.
After interpreters had translated Tarke’s speech to those assembled, the general concluded the session by distributing medals to each chief, commemorating the day and the treaty they had signed.
At this, the meeting adjourned.

Sunday, October 13, 2019

48th annual Holiday Bazaar - Batesville



48th annual Holiday Bazaar
November 3, 2019
10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Batesville, Indiana Primary School

I will have my books set up at the 48th annual Holiday Bazaar in Batesville, Indiana at the Batesville Primary School on Indiana State Road 46. 

Thursday, October 10, 2019

Sample Chapter - Short History of Indiana's Historic Markers - Atterbury Army Air Field

Sample Chapter
Short History of Indiana's Historic Markers 
Atterbury Army Air Field

Title of Marker:
Atterbury Army Air Field
Location:
In front of chapel at Middle Road and Grissom Avenue, Atterbury Army Air Field, Columbus (Bartholomew County, Indiana)
Installed by:
2007 Indiana Historical Bureau and Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum
Marker ID #: 
03.2007.2
Marker Text: 
Side one:
Construction begun summer 1942 under Captain Stratton O. Hammon, who used broad authority over laborers, suppliers, and railroad; base in use February 1943. More than 1, 000 workers employed during construction. Base was over 2, 000 acres, cost over four million dollars, and included more than one hundred buildings, intended to be temporary.
Side two:
WW II uses included training B-25, B-26, and glider pilots; by 1944, wounded from Europe received here for Wakeman Hospital. Wounded soldiers during Korean War received here. Renamed 1954 to honor Lt. John Bakalar. Base closed 1970. Original building made into chapel; restored and named for Women's Air Service Pilot Jean Lewellen Norbeck 1990s.

Short History by the Author
The task of organizing the mammoth task of constructing the airfields needed to train 70,000 pilots annually fell to General of the Army and General of the Air Force Henry Harley "Hap" Arnold. He moved the responsibility of building air bases from the overburdened Quartermaster Corps to the U. S. Army Corps of Engineer. The Army had no plan for any of the bases, only a set of guidelines that followed General Arnold's concept of "Spartan" simplicity for the bases. There would be no frills or creature comforts at these bases. The buildings would be simple lumber and tar paper construction. These buildings were quite cold in winter and hot in summer. The hangers were of wood or concrete. The guidelines called for one secure hanger to hide the Norden bomb sight, which was top-secret. Atterbury's construction followed these guidelines during its construction. The United States, in the face of major war, needed a lot of air bases and it needed them fast. The site that Atterbury would occupy had been open corn fields. This land needed to be turned into a United States Army Air Field as quickly as possible.
The Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum preserves the memory and history of this airfield. Located on site, the museum is a treasure trove of memorabilia, history and exhibits covering the Atterbury Army Air Field and Bakalar Air Base. For more information, contact:


Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum
4742 Ray Boll Boulevard
Columbus, Indiana 47203
812-372-4356
abmuseum@att.net
http://www.atterburybakalarairmuseum.org/

Sample Chapter - Short History of Rivers, Streams and Lakes - Connecticut River

Sample Chapter
Short History of Rivers, Streams and Lakes
Connecticut River

Connecticut derives from the Mohegan Indian tribe’s word, quinetucket, which means “beside the long, tidal river." The 406 miles river flows through four states and is New England's longest river. Its source is in the Fourth Connecticut Lake near the Canadian border in New Hampshire.  During its course generally southwest, it feeds the Third, Second and First Connecticut Lakes. After its next destination, Lake Charles, it continues southwest until it reaches Stewartstown, New Hampshire, where it turns south to form the border between Vermont and New Hampshire. The White River joins it at White River, Vermont a few miles south of the Dartmouth College campus. Another major tributary, the West River, joins it at Brattleboro, Vermont. The Connecticut enters Massachusetts about ten miles south of this junction. It leaves Massachusetts a few miles south of Springfield Massachusetts and enters Connecticut. After passing through Hartford, the river enters the Atlantic Ocean south of Old Lyme, Connecticut.  27 towns in Vermont and 26 in New Hampshire border the river.
History
The broad fertile valley of the river drew several native tribes to its soils before European settlement. These tribes included the Pequots, Mohegan, Mattabesset and the Pocomtuc.
The Dutch
Dutch explorer Adriane Block is the first recorded European explorer to penetrate the Connecticut in 1614. Calling it the "Fresh River, he claimed it for the Dutch as part of the New Netherlands colony. The Dutch constructed Fort Huys de Hoop in 1623 at the current site of Hartford, Connecticut.
The Puritans
Puritan groups from the Plymouth colony began settling along the river beginning in 1635. The main settlements were Hartford, Springfield, Matianuck (now Windsor, Connecticut) and Wethersfield. Another Puritan group out of Cambridge, Massachusetts established Agawam Plantation, now Springfield, Massachusetts. The growing strength of the English colonies forced the Dutch out in 1664.
Industry
Colonists continued to flow into the area and many industries developed. Farms, gristmills and other industries developed. Sometime around 1865 logging drives of trees cut near the Third Connecticut Lake flowed downriver to saw mills in Wilder and Bellows Falls, Vermont. Thirteen dams along the river provide water and recreation for many of the residents that leave nearby.

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Short History of Fire Fighting - Indiana Edition





Description
Publication Date to be Announced


Preview Chapter
Buy Direct from Author
Softbound Price - $

Other Books in the Series
Short History of Libraries, Printing and Language - Indiana Edition
Short History of Fire Fighting - Indiana Edition


Available In Multiple Formats - Ebook And Softbound:
Draft to Digital Universal Link
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Playster
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble - Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Scribid
24 Symbols
Walmart Books
Apple


The Bookshelf
101 N Walnut St,
Batesville, IN 47006

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Sample Chapter - Short History of Fire Fighting - Indiana Edition - McCormick's Creek Fire Tower

Sample Chapter
Short History of Fire Fighting - Indiana Edition
McCormick's Creek Fire Tower
Used as an active fire tower from its construction in 1935 until 1967, the McCormick's Creek Fire Tower now serves as a popular observation site for park visitors. Constructed by CCC Company #589, the tower is located on Trail 4 near the Park Office. The elevation of the land the tower sits in is 770 feet  above sea level. The eighty-six foot tall tower's lookout cab measures seven feet along each wall with windows containing nine panes on each wall. The National Historic Lookout Register registered the tower on November 12, 2008. The tower underwent an extensive renovation in 2017. The park has opened the tower to the public.  

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Preview Chapter - Short History of Gardening and Agriculture - Reaping Grain



Preview Chapter
Short History of Gardening and Agriculture
Reaping Grain 
Cradle Reaper
Also called the cradle scythe or grain cradle, this implement was an adaptation of the scythe. Developed sometime before 1800, the cradle reaper began to see widespread use between 1800 and 1840 in the United States. The cradle reaper consisted of a set of wooden finger shaped spokes attached to the handle of the scythe. The purpose was to catch the stalks of grain and keep them aligned when cut, to make it easier to tie the cut grain into shocks. The McCormick Mechanical Reaper eventually replaced it.
Mechanical Reaper
Several inventors toyed with devising a mechanical reaper during the Nineteenth Century, however it was Robert McCormick that first came up with a design for a working reaper in 1831. He was unable to perfect the device, so he asked his son John to improve it.

Monday, September 30, 2019

Sample Chapter - Time Line of the American Revolution - 1776 - April 15, 1776 - Georgia Congress Passes "Rules and Regulations"

Sample Chapter
Time Line of the American Revolution - 1776
April 15, 1776 - Georgia Congress Passes "Rules and Regulations"
The Georgia Provincial Congress passed document called the Rules and Regulations on April 15, 1776, which many consider Georgia's first constitution. Meant as a temporary measure, the Rules and Regulations served as a means of working with the other colonies to achieve independence. Based on the concept of popular sovereignty, the a written constitution replaced the Rules and Regulations the next year. The nine provisions outlined the general outline of the government, set the pay for various elected officials and set the manner of choosing the delegates to the congress and the commander in chief.

Friday, September 27, 2019

Sample Chapter - A Timeline of Indiana History - 1795 - 1800 - June 30, 1795 - Native Chiefs Ask for Wine

Sample Chapter
A Timeline of Indiana History - 1795 - 1800
June 30, 1795 - Native Chiefs Ask for Wine
During the ensuing days, representatives of the Pottawattamie and Chippewa have arrived at Fort Greenville.
The council convened on June 30, at the request of the chiefs. La Gris rose to speak to the General. He thanked General Wayne for the provisions they had been given during their stay as they waited the arrival of more tribal chiefs. However, they complained of the monotony of the diet and asked for mutton and pork. Additionally, since the weather was turning cooler, they requested wine. The noted that the warriors that had accompanied them were getting restless, as there was nothing for them to do as they awaited the arrival of more tribes.
General Wayne replied that Blue Jacket and several others would soon arrive. He also explained that they had no pork and the little mutton they had was for those that were sick and, rarely, for the officers. He promised them that he would give each of the chiefs a sheep for them to eat and some wine. At that, the meeting adjourned.

A Timeline of Indiana History - 1795 - 1800




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Thursday, September 26, 2019

Sample Chapter - Short History of Railroads - Railway switch patented by Charles Fox


Sample Chapter 
Short History of Railroads 
Railway switch patented by Charles Fox
1832 - Railway switch patented by Charles Fox
Before the railway switch, railroads used a device called wagon turnplates or a sliding rail.
Sliding Rail
This device resembled the modern turntable used to turn locomotives around or move them to different tracks in a train yard. In the sliding rail, the track was mounted to a circular wheel that rotated around the center of the device. The wheel's diameter was governed by the length of the wagon used on the railroad, or tramway. To switch the device, the horses pulled the wagon onto the turnplate and unhitched. A tramway employee then had to rotate the turnplate so the rails matched that of the track he wanted to switch it to. Then the horses were hitched and the wagon could move along the new route. This was a cumbersome process that limited wagon size to that of the diameter of the turnplate and limited the weight on the wagon. Mr. Fox's invention changed this.
The Rail Switch
The rail switch, or railway points, employed a set of linked, tapering rails that are synchronized in movement. These moving rails can be moved into one of two positions, one that allows the train to go straight or another position that turns the train onto a divergent set of rails. In the days before electrically powered switches, a railroad employee still had to manually operate the switch; however the train remained moving as it crossed the switch. The rail switch could accommodate any length of locomotive or rolling stock. As railroads switched over from horse drawn wagons to steam driven locomotives the rail switch proved a much more versatile mechanism for switching engines. The turnplate survives, with many improvements, as a means of moving locomotives around in a train yard or turning an engine around.
Turntable

Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Preview Chapter - Short History of Roads and Highways - Thomas MacDonald

Preview Chapter 
Short History of Roads and Highways - Thomas MacDonald
The son of John and Sarah Elizabeth Harris MacDonald was native to Leadville, Colorado. During his childhood he received his education at elementary and high school at public schools in Montezuma, Iowa after his family moved to Iowa. His father owned lumber and grain dealerships, which required transportation of grain and lumber on horse drawn wooden wagons. The poor state of the roads, which were impassable for much of the year, disgusted him. He attended college Iowa State College of Agricultural and Mechanical Arts. He studied road building and became involved in the Good Roads movement after graduating with a bachelor's degree in civil engineering in 1904. He married he married Elizabeth Dunham in 1907. The couple would have two children. He received appointment as the Assistant in Charge of Good Roads Investigation in Iowa that year. He became Iowa's head civil engineer in 1913 and played an instrumental role in the passage of the Federal Aid Road Act of 1916. Congress appointed him as the head of the Bureau of Public Roads on July 1, 1919. He would remain at the head of the bureau until his retirement in 1953. During his tenure he was the chief architect of the highway system in the United States. The Federal Aid Highway Act of 1921 was his innovation. He supervised the construction of 3.5 million miles of highways and helped lay the foundation for Eisenhower's U.S. Interstate Highway System.  

Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Preview Chapter - Short History of Rivers, Streams and Lakes - Kennebec River


Preview Chapter 
Short History of Rivers, Streams and Lakes
Kennebec River
Kennebec River, Maine
Length - 230 miles
Drainage Area - 5,870 square miles
Discharge - 5,893 million gallons/day (avg.)
The Kennebec River flows out of Moosehead Lake in West Central Maine and flows 230 miles to discharge into the Atlantic Ocean near Popham Beach.
Moosehead Lake
Fed by numerous small tributaries and the Roach River, Moosehead's primary contributor is the Moose River, which flows from Brassua Lake. Moosehead Lake is the largest mountain lake in the eastern United States. The Kennebec River begins at two points in the lake, the West Outlet, ad, Maine and flows about three miles southwest to Indian Pond. The Kennebec flows past the Harris Station Dam at the southwest end of the lake and proceeds through central Maine to its mouth in the Atlantic Ocean. US Route 201 follows it to Solon Maine, when it diverts away from the river. At Solon, Maine State Road 201A follows it on the west to its terminus at Norridgewock. US Route 2 follows it for a short distance to its intersection with US Route 201, which proceeds along its west bank through Augusta, Maine to Gardiner, Maine. Maine State Road 24 follows the river on the west bank from Gardiner to south of Richmond, where it diverts to the west. State Road 127 follows the east bank for a distance. The river enters the Atlantic near Popham State Park.
Popham Beach State Park
10 Perkins Farm Lane
Phippsburg, ME 04562
(207) 389-1335
https://www.maine.gov/cgi-bin/online/doc/parksearch/details.pl?park_id=22
The Kennebec is navigable by ocean vessels for about forty miles of its length, to the state capital at August.
History
French explorer Samuel de Champlain navigated as far as Bath on his mapping expedition in 1605.
August 13, 1607 - Popham Colony Established
George Popham led a colony to current Maine to found a colony along the Kennebec River as a venture for the Plymouth Company.
George Popham (1550–1608)
The son of Edward Popham and Joan Norton Popham, Edward was native to Somerset, England. Historians know little of his early life until he emerged as leader of the expedition that founded the colony that bore his name. He died in December, 1607, leaving command of the colony to twenty-five year old Raleigh Gilbert.
The Expedition Begins
King James chartered the Plymouth Company at the same time he chartered the Virginia Company that founded Jamestown. The purpose of the companies was to raise private capital through the sale of stock to found the colonies. The charter for the Plymouth Colony included the area between 38° and 45° N. The Virginia Company's charter included the area between 34° and 41° N. The area overlapped and the two companies were to found colonies in the areas that did not overlap. Whichever colony proved successful would receive the overlapping area in between. George Popham led the expedition that departed Plymouth, England on May 31, 1607, on two ships, the Gift of God and the Mary. The expedient included over 100 men and boys. The purpose of the mission included prospecting for precious metals, furs and spices. The men also wanted to prove that the trees of the New World were suitable for building ships. The ships arrived at the mouth of the Kennebec River on August 13, 1607. The men started building a fort they would call Fort St. George almost immediately. They would begin building the ship a few days later.
Excerpted from the Author's Book
Colonial American History Stories - 1215 - 1664

Revolutionary War
Benedict Arnold followed the Kennebec as he began his invasion of Quebec in 1775.
Early August, 1775 - Benedict Arnold Meets with Washington
While Benedict Arnold was at Fort Ticonderoga he had spent time devising a plan to attack Quebec City to provide a diversion for General Schuyler's attack against Montreal. Arnold wanted to follow an old Indian trail up the Kennebec River through Maine and then travel down the Chaudière River to a point across from Quebec. Arnold's intelligence led him to believe that the British had only 600 men to defend the entire Quebec Province. An American thrust to capture Quebec and Montreal might persuade the Canadians to join the American cause. General Schuyler's attack from the south would divert British strength to defend against this threat, leaving Arnold's attack against Quebec almost undefended. Washington studied Arnold's plan and approved them, but he wanted Arnold to wait for General Schuyler's approval before proceeding to implement it.
September 19, 1775 - Benedict Arnold and His Force Depart Newburyport
Benedict Arnold, commanding 1100 men, departed from Newburyport, Massachusetts on September on ships bound for the mouth of the Kennebec River.
Arrival at Kennebec River
The voyage to the mouth of the Kennebec took just twelve hours to complete. Upon arrival, Arnold sent scouts upriver and inspected the bateaux constructed for the expedition. Hastily built, the boats were of poor quality and promised to cause many problems as the force moved up the Kennebec River. Arnold had his men begin construction more of the boats. The force spent the next three days camped at the site, building more bateaux and gathering information.
Bateaux 
The word "bateaux" derives from the French word for "boat." The craft was a flat bottomed boat with pointed ends, usually from twenty-four to fifty feet wide and about eight feet wide, though the size of the boats varied widely due to its proposed use and materials available for construction.  It was possible to mount a small sail on the boat; however the flat bottom made it difficult to navigate. The boats worked well in rivers and streams as the flat bottom provided a shallow draft and provided a suitable platform for cargo. Usually builders used sawn lumber to construct the boats, however builders used whatever resources they had available to build them. The boats found extensive use in colonial times and Revolutionary War soldiers used them extensively to shuttle troops and supplies.
September 23, 1775 - Arnold's Force Reaches Fort Western
Arnold's force departed the mouth of the Kennebec River and traveled upstream to Fort Western, which was about ten miles upriver. Upon arrival, he sent out two teams of scouts Lieutenant Archibald Steele, in command of the pioneer corps, was to blaze a trail along the Kennebec river for the army to follow. The other under Lieutenant Nathaniel Church, was to do surveys of the area to determine the distance Arnold's force would have to travel each day to reach their destination.
Lieutenant Archibald Steele (1740 - October 19, 1832)
The son of William and Rachel Carr Steele. Archibald was native to Drumore, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Historians know little about his early life other than that he was a farmer and had married Jane, last name unknown, three months before the beginning of the Revolutionary War. When word of the fighting reached him, he left his plow in the furrow, took his rifle gathered a half dozen or so local Lancaster lads and traveled to Boston.
Pennsylvania Riflemen
Steele was chosen as First Lieutenant of the company of the men, who were all expert riflemen, using the rifles made in their home Lancaster County. After their arrival near Boston they joined the Pennsylvania Riflemen. At Boston they became part of the front line trenches. Here the company quickly gained a reputation with the British as a company that could fire accurately within six inches from a 300 yard distance.
Mission to Quebec
Steele's company was one of the companies that joined Benedict Arnold's mission to Quebec. The company departed from Cambridge Massachusetts and traveled by ship to the mouth of the Kennebec River. From there the force traveled by bateaux upriver. At their first destination, Fort Western, Arnold appointed Steele to lead the pioneer corps, which was to travel ahead of the army blazing the trail. Arnold allowed Steele choose any eight men from the army for this important task. Steel chose men from his own company. Before the end of this difficult mission two of the men would succumb to the rigors and leave the unit and rejoined Arnold's army. Two others died before the end of the mission.
Difficult Mission
Steele and his men faced a difficult task eking out a route through rough, unmapped terrain through the Kennebec River's course. Traveling by canoe, the men had to portage around rapids and waterfalls and risk drowning in fast currents and in the cold Maine weather. The small company lost all their supplies when the canoe capsized in one difficult stretch of the river. The company finally reached the St. Lawrence River after a cold, hungry, harrowing mission and waited for Arnold's army to catch up with them.
Nathaniel Church (October 22, 1732 - February 5, 1825)
The son of Caleb and Deborah Woodworth Church, Nathaniel was native to Little Compton, Newport County, Rhode Island. Historians know little of his early life. He married Sarah Wood, with whom he would have one child. At the outbreak of hostilities, Church offered his services by joining Colonel Thomas Church's regiment where he served as a first lieutenant. The Church regiment went to Cambridge to join the Siege of Boston in May, 1775. While in service there, Nathaniel Church joined Benedict Arnold's mission to Quebec.
Fort Western
Constructed in 1754 by the British during the French and Indian War, the fort is the United States oldest surviving wooden stockade fort. The fort's main purpose was to serve as a storehouse supporting Fort Halifax, about seventeen miles upriver. Supplies from Boston arrived at the fort on ships about four times a year. After unloading, they traveled upriver by bateaux to Fort Halifax. The fort was never attacked, but staffed by a British garrison until 1767, which was the last time soldiers were stationed in the fort. That was the last military use for the fort, except as a staging area for Benedict Arnold's force in September, 1775. Arnold and his force occupied the fort and surrounding grounds for about a week as they acquired more supplies, gathered information and repaired their boats.
September 28, 1775 - Benedict Arnold's Forces Reach Fort Halifax
Benedict Arnold's expedition reached Fort Halifax on September 28, 1775, where they would camp for several days, repairing boats and making further preparations for their Canada campaign.
Fort Halifax
Construction began on Fort Halifax on July 25, 1754 when British Major General John Winslow arrived at the site with 600 British troops during the early stages of the French and Indian War. The general chose a site at the confluence of the Sebasticook and Kennebec rivers. The fort occupied an old Indian village and was at a major strategic point. The fort would provide protection for the residents of Maine from Indian incursions and serve as a trading post. Winslow named the fort after George Montague-Dunk, 2nd Earl of Halifax, President of the Board of Trade at the time. An 800 foot palisade surrounded the structures inside the fort. Two two-story blockhouses flanked it on the north and south sides and a sentry box occupied another corner of the fort. The buildings inside the stockade included the soldier's barracks and the "fort house." The fort house served as officer's quarters, armory and a supply depot. The fort included several pieces of artillery. Two fierce bulldogs guarded the fort's gates. In addition to this, two more blockhouses stood on a hill overlooking the fort. When the war ended the British government sold the fort to Dr. Silvester Gardiner, who leased it to surveyor Ephraim Ballard. Ballard, who served as a caretaker of the fort, occupied the fort when Arnold's advance team led by Lieutenant Archibald Steele. The fort included a tavern. Steele and his men had arrived at the fort, which by this time was in a deteriorating condition, on September 23. The fort was on the northern fringes of the frontier in 1775.
Further Preparations
Arnold's men camped on the grounds outside the fort while Arnold and the other officers took accommodations with some of the settlers' homes in the area. The soldiers repaired the bateaux and hauled them around the rapids and waterfalls upstream on the Kennebec River.
Excerpted from the Author's Book
1775
https://mossyfeetbooks.blogspot.com/2019/04/time-line-of-american-revolution-1775.html
Logging, Shipbuilding and Ice
A major ice business began in and around Gardiner, Maine in 1814. Farmer's idled by the winter weather cut ice and floated to ice houses where it was packed in sawdust. In the spring, the ice was loaded on ships, packed in sawdust and sent south to markets in the West Indies and the southern United States. The city of Bath, referred to as "The City of Ships" emerged as a major shipbuilding site. North of Augusta the Kennebec served as a transportation medium for logs cut from the forests upstream and floated downstream to Bath, Augusta and other cities along to river to build ships, furniture and provide pulpwood for papermaking.


Short History of Rivers, Streams and Lakes


Book Cover Photo



Description:
Publishing Date to be Announced

Preview Chapter 1
Connecticut River
Buy Direct from Author
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Other Books in the Series
A History of the Transportation Revolution
History of the Telephone 
A History of Time
Short History of Libraries, Printing and Language

Available In Multiple Formats - Ebook And Softbound:
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The Bookshelf
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