Sunday, January 28, 2018

A Year of Colonial American History Stories - Book 2

A Year of Colonial American History Stories - Book 2
A Year of Colonial American History Stories - Book 2

Available On:
Description:
A Year of Colonial American History - Book – 2 has one history lesson a day in the settlement of early America. This December edition covers the historical events of December. The stories include both famous historical events as well as many forgotten little known, obscure facts.
This frontier history includes the following stories:
January 10, 1749 - Petition Filed To Repeal of the Ban Against Slaves
February 27, 1717 - The Great Snow of 1717
March 10, 1753- Liberty Bell Hung
April 3, 1735 - Georgia Bans Slavery
May 12, 1777 - First Ice Cream Advertisement
June 26, 1740 - Siege of Fort Mose - War of Jenkins Ear
July 07, 1774 - Paul Revere Adopts Snake Device
August 15, 1756 - Daniel Boone and Rebecca Married
September 11, 1740 - First Mention of a Black Doctor in Colonies
October 20, 1774 - Congress created the Continental Association
November 05, 1492 - Christopher Columbus learns of maize
December 21, 1767 - Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania

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A Year of Colonial American History - Book - 1

A Year of Colonial American History - Book - 1
Description:
The A Year of Colonial American History - Book – 1 books present the story behind the headlines. It is easy and fun to learn a lesson in colonial American history facts daily. If you have ever read those “This Day in History” listings, you may have been curious about the events behind the scenes. The 366 short history stories in this collection of history stories are from the frontier period of American history. They include both well known and obscure, little known historical facts and forgotten events for a whole year.
This complete edition of historical events includes:
January 10, 1776 Common Sense By Thomas Paine Published
February 9, 1674 English Re-Conquer New York From Netherlands
March 17, 1637 - The First Recorded Celebration Of St. Patrick's Day In Boston
April 6, 1712 - Slave Revolt In New York
May 3, 1654 - First Toll Bridge in the Colonies Authorized
June 5, 1752 - Benjamin Franklin's First Kite Experiment
July 4, 1754 - George Washington Surrenders Fort Necessity to France
August 27, 1665 - Ye Bare & Ye Cubb" Is First Play Performed In North America

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Kobo
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Available in multiple ebook formats and softbound
Buy Paul Wonning's At:

Picker's Paradise Trader Mall

129 N Broadway Street
Greensburg, Indiana, IN 47420
(812) 663-0021

On the Square in Downtown Greensburg
The Bookshelf
101 N Walnut St,
Batesville, IN 47006
http://www.bookshelfbatesville.com/
(812) 934-5800
bookshelf101@hotmail.com
Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
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© 2018 Paul Wonning

Friday, January 26, 2018

Sample Chapter - WRBI Radio History - Historic Travel Guide to Ripley County, Indiana

Historic Travel Guide to Ripley County, Indiana
Historic Travel Guide to Ripley County, Indiana
WRBI Radio History
WRBI Radio began serving Batesville with news, weather reports, sports broadcasting and helping area residents keep up with community events when it hit the airwaves on May 14, 1977. The first County Showdown aired on July 21, 1983. On April 18, 1985 WRBI held an open house in its new studio on the second floor of the Batesville State Bank building. The station began sponsoring local tennis tournaments with the first one held on June 18, 1989. The popular annual event "Reality Check" began   October 12, 1998. WRBI helped Batesville celebrate its Sesquicentennial by hosting the Vintage Old Time Baseball Game on August 4, 2002. The Ripley County Chamber of Commerce honored the station with its Business of the The Year on May 14, 2008. In December 2014, the station moved to a new studio on the ground floor of the PNC Bank Building on Main Street.  The FCC approved a power increase on April 17, 2015 that enables the station to cover a larger area in Ripley, Franklin and Decatur counties.
WRBI Radio
133 S Main St
Batesville, IN 47006
https://wrbiradio.com

Historic Travel Guide to Ripley County, Indiana
Over 550 Pages
Release - Mid February

Available in multiple ebook formats and softbound
Buy Paul Wonning's At:

Picker's Paradise Trader Mall
129 N Broadway Street
Greensburg, Indiana, IN 47420
(812) 663-0021

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© 2018 Paul Wonning

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Sample Chapter - Gatherer of Souls - Dark Fantasy Novel

Gatherer of Souls
Paul R. Wonning
Chapter One

Gatherer of Souls
Gatherer of Souls
Kelley Dawes had no inkling of the terror that would soon explode upon her contented world. It all began in a most exciting way, the day she started her new job and made a new friend.
Kelley walked down the hallway and stopped in front of the door at which the receptionist had indicated. The gold plaque on the door indicated it was the right office.  Kelly gave a light knock and entered when a voice from within said, “Come on in.”
She pushed the door open.
Her new boss, Jason Bell, greeted her with a smile,“ Good morning, Kelley, how are you this morning?”
“Fine,” said Kelley, with a nervous tinge to her voice. “I am ready to start, Mr. Bell.”
“Good, I think you’ll like working here, Ms. Dawes.” Jason replied as he reached across his desk and punched a button on his phone.
“Yes, Mr. Bell,” a feminine voice answered.
“Betsy, Kelley Dawes is in here. She is ready to start. Can you come in and show her to her cubicle and get her started?”
“Sure, Mr. Bell, I’ll be right in.”
A moment later, the door opened and a dark haired young lady stepped inside.
“This is Kelley Dawes, Betsy. Kelley, this is my administrative assistant Betsy Neyer.”
The young ladies smiled at each other as Jason Bell continued, “Betsy, show Kelley to her office and help her get started.”
“Okay, Mr. Bell. Come on Kelley, just follow me.”
The two young women left the office and began walking down the hall, which soon opened into a large room with a dozen or so cubicles. Overhead fluorescent lights lit it.  The place had the normal office smells of electronic equipment and paper.
“You’ll be working in this cubicle right here,” said Betsy, indicating a small office right across from the hall.
Kelley went in and sat down at her new desk, powered up the computer and watched as it booted up.
“Where are you from?” asked Betsy as they waited for the computer to connect to the network.
“Centertown. It’s down south.”
“I know where it is. I am from Turkeyfoot.”
“Turkeyfoot, why that is just a few miles from Centertown. We played you guys in basketball.”
“So we are neighbors,” Betsy said with a smile. “Are you living here in Indianapolis?”
“Yes, I have an apartment here on the south side on Madison Avenue. It's not too far from the office.”
“Really? I live nearby, in an apartment on Stop 11. We are just a few minutes from each other.”
By now, the computer was ready, and Betsy spent the next two hours showing Betsy her new duties. When Kelley looked like she could continue, Betsy said, “I have a report to file for Mr. Bell. I will go do that and come back. It will take me about an hour.”
“Okay, I think I will be fine here awhile.”
“If you have any questions, just call me. All you have to do is dial my extension, which is 002.”
Betsy walked away, while Kelley pecked at her computer. She studied the files before here and completing the tasks Betsy told her to do.
Time passed quickly, and before Kelley knew it, Betsy was standing by her desk, studying her work.
“That is great, Kelley. It looks like you are doing just fine.”
Kelley looked up, and brushed her black hair back behind her shoulders.
“I think I understand what I am doing.”
“Say, it is almost lunchtime. What do you say we do lunch? When we come back and I will show you the rest of your duties?”
Kelley stood up and powered the machine down as she answered, “That sounds wonderful, I am famished.”
“How do you like living in the city so far,” asked Betsy as the two walked down the hall and out into the street.
“I haven’t been here long,” said Kelley. “My brother lives up here and helped me find an apartment. I really have not had time to enjoy the city much yet. I just moved and got most of my stuff unpacked. I am still exploring this part of town, trying to find the right stores and restaurants.”
“Tell you what,” said Betsy. “I am not doing anything tonight. How about we go shopping and I can show you around town.”
“That sounds great,” said Kelley, smiling. “Thank you.”

Over the next several weeks, the two young women spent a great deal of time together. They explored the downtown nightspots of Indianapolis and shopped.
A few weeks later, in early October, the hint of falling autumn leaves scented the air. The two were enjoying a beer at a popular downtown tavern, basking in the golden sun from their table on the sidewalk. They watched as traffic and passersby went by. The sun glinted off the Artsgarden that spanned Washington Street nearby.
“Gosh, Betsy, this is great. Don’t you miss Turkeyfoot, though?”
“Sometimes,” she said. “This city is wonderful, but sometimes I get tired of it. It is so busy all the time, and the traffic is crazy.”
“Maybe you and I should find a place in a small town nearby to rent. We could save some money by renting one place.”
“That sounds like fun,” said Betsy. “It would have to be close, though.”
“Lets pick up some beer and go to my apartment and spend some time searching the internet and see what we can find.”
“Okay, let’s,” said Betsy. She drained her mug, finished the last crumbs of the pie on her plate and the two left.
Hours later, Betsy pointed at the computer screen as she observed, “That looks promising.”
“Yes, it is in Amackville, just an hour east on the interstate. It looks like an old farmhouse. I’ll call the owner and see how much they want for it.”
She dialed her phone, listened to it ring. A brief conversation followed. She held her hand over the phone and leaned across to Betsy and whispered in excitement, “They want less for a whole house than I pay for my apartment alone.”
She told Kelley the amount.
“We can ride in together most days. Even with the extra gas, we would still save money.”
“That, and live in a neat old house.”
“Set up an appointment for this Saturday for us to look at it.”
Kelley set up the appointment, her face lit by a smile.
“We can meet with him at 11:00 Saturday morning.”
“Great. Say, there is a Comforsuite Hotel there, just off the interstate. What say we make a weekend of it? We can look at the house and decide if we want it while we explore the town. We can come back Sunday.”
"That sounds wonderful.”
Kelley surfed to the chain’s website and made the necessary reservations.

Saturday morning found them at the house, looking at it from the driveway with appraising eyes.
“The garage isn’t attached, but it is a two car so there is room for both our cars.”
“It has a great big yard, and there is a huge tree in the back yard.”
Another car pulled up behind them, and they got out of the car. A man got out, walked towards them and held out his hand.
“Good morning, ladies,” he said as he shook Betsy’s hand.
“I am Betsy Neyer,” she said, “and this,” she glanced at Kelley, “is Kelley Dawes.”
“Good to meet you both,” he said. “My name is Ralph Wittbach, but you can just call me Buck,”
He put his hands behind his back as he asked, “I just finished restoring it a few weeks back. Are you two ready to look at the house?”
Betsy nodded, and the man took out his keys and walked up the stone steps that led to the front door. The two women followed. He opened the door and they stepped inside.
“Wow,” Kelley gushed as she glanced around the room. Buck had done a masterful job of restoring the old home. The scent of fresh paint still clung to the air and new cabinets gleamed in the kitchen. An oak staircase rose majestically in the center of the foyer. Huge windows allowed the golden autumn sun to fill the room.
“The windows are all new, and I insulated it before putting the siding back on,” informed Buck. “It’s not bad at all to heat. In addition, there is a wood burning stove, if you choose to use it, which cuts back on the heating bills quite a bit. I can supply the wood if you want it.”
They toured the rest of the house, and both loved it. It was charming, and still smelled of fresh paint and carpet.
When they finished, Betsy said, “We are staying in town this weekend at the Comfort Suite. Can we call you tomorrow morning to let you know what we decide?”
“Sure,” said Buck. “I am not busy tomorrow. I can meet you here again in the morning or afternoon, whichever you settle on.”
“That sounds great,” said Kelley. “I will call you in the morning to let you know what we decide.”

“There is a bowling alley and a theatre downtown,” said Kelley as she tipped a cold glass of beer to her lips.
“I saw a BigMart at the last exit, about ten minutes back on the interstate. The town looks clean and there are lots of places to eat.”
“And it is only about fifty five minutes from the office.”
“It takes thirty minutes to get there from my apartment.”
“We can take the interstate to the Acton exit and go in on Southport, avoiding some of the worst traffic. Heck Bets, I like it.”
Betsy smiled as she eyed the chicken dinner the waitress placed in front of her.
“So do I. I think we should take it, Bets.”
“So do I. I will call Buck in the morning with our decision.”

Bacon, coffee, sausage filled the restaurant with their comforting blend of aromas. The hostess seated Betsy and Kelley at a table that overlooked the busy highway.
“I’ll have a coffee,” said Kelley. “Cream and sugar also, please.”
“Me, too,” Betsy said. She picked up a menu and perused the selections.
“What do you think, Kel? Do you want to rent the house?”
“I would like to,” she said. “The lease would be for a year. If we hate it that much, we can surely last that long.”
Betsy took a sip of her coffee, saying with satisfaction, “My, that is delicious.
She looked up at her friend and said, “I think it will be fun, Kel.”
Kelley placed her menu back down and gave her order to the waitress who stood; pad in hand, by their table. Then she looked at Betsy. “Then I will call Buck. We can meet him there this afternoon, sign the lease and go back to the city.”
She pulled out her cell phone, punched the number and after a brief pause, said, “Yes, Buck? It’s Kelley. Say, we would like to take the house. Can we meet you there later and sign the lease? We can? Okay, see you later.”
She returned the phone to her purse, saying, “He will be there at 12:30.”
“Cool,” said Betsy. “Enough time to eat our breakfast and go for a walk in that park we saw yesterday.”
“That was nice, Bets. We have everything here we want, and we are close enough to the city to walk there to enjoy it.”
By then their orders arrived and the two young women dived into their breakfasts.

Betsy took the sheaf of papers from Kelley and scribbled her signature below Kelley’s name. Then she handed the papers to Buck, who took them and placed them in a yellow envelope.
Kelley glanced at him and asked, “When can we move in?”
Buck smiled as he answered, “The lease runs from November 1 to October 31 next year. However, the house is empty now. You can move in any time you like. Here are the keys.”
He slid six keys across the Formica counter top towards Betsy.
“There are two keys for the front and back doors and two for the garage. The remote garage door openers are on the shelf by the door in the garage.”
“It is a wonderful house,” Betsy said as she picked the keys up. She separated two off and handed them to Kelley. Then she slipped the other three in her purse.
Buck stepped back and looked around.
“It was my mom’s house,” he said. “She passed away about a year ago.”
“I’m sorry,” said Betsy.
Buck shrugged as he said, “She was old and sick. She had been in the nursing home for about a year. No one has lived in this house for about two years. I have been taking care of it. Last summer I had it remodeled, so all the improvements are new. I didn’t have the heart to sell it. I am just glad I got two people in it I can trust.”
His eyes wandered to Kelley as he said, “I hope you two young ladies enjoy living here.”
“Oh, we will,” said Kelley. “Both Betsy and I are from small towns. We like the city, but miss the slower pace of a town like this.”
“It can get pretty hectic here, too,” said Buck. “But I know what you are saying. I lived in Pittsburg for a while. I couldn’t wait to get back here.”
At this, he glanced at his watch.
“I want to get over to the orchard before it closes. I want some fresh apple cider and the wife wants a bushel of apples.”
Betsy’s eyes lit at the mention of an orchard as she queried, “Where is the orchard?”
Buck pointed north.
“It is north of Bremen, on the highway. It is about a ten-minute drive from the interstate. You can’t miss it.”
Kelley looked at Betsy, saying, “I would like a jug of cider before we go back.”
Betsy smiled and said, “Some apples would be nice, too.”
After Buck left, the women went over the house, planning their move. “We can move Halloween weekend,” said Kelley. “My brother Bruce and his girlfriend will help us. He has a couple of buddies that I am sure would help out too,”
“We can have a little party afterwards,” said Betsy. “That restaurant that we ate at last night caters. I saw the sign. We can have them bring some of that fried chicken. We can have some beer cold. There is enough room for everyone to sleep over before going back on Sunday.”
“That sounds like fun,” said Kelley. “Halloween is on Sunday this year. We will find out on our first night alone if this house is haunted.”
With a toss of her head, Betsy snorted, “Hah. I don’t believe in ghosts.”
“Neither do I,” said Kelley, with a laugh. “But you never know about these old houses. I am sure someone has died in here. Maybe they are trapped and can’t get away.”
“Yeah, right.” Betsy glanced at her phone. “Buck said the orchard closes at three. We can just make it before heading back.”
“Then let’s go. We can come back down next Friday night, bring some things down and get the house ready.”
With that, the two locked up, got the garage remotes from the garage and drove off.

Betsy moved about the living room, gathering beer bottles and tossing them in a garbage bag. From the kitchen, she could hear the sound of the water running from the faucet as Kelley cleaned up the dishes.
The move had gone smoothly. Bruce, his girlfriend and his buddies had stayed the night, partying well into it. Bruce was an excellent cook and had whipped up a delicious breakfast, followed by more beer. By mid afternoon, the party had left, taking their trucks and laughter with them.
“Great party,” she called out.
“Yeah, it was a wonderful way to break in our new house.”
Betsy glanced out at the sun, which was lowering on the horizon. “I think I am going to walk over to that little park. Do you want to go along?”
“Yeah, give me a minute. I want to finish up here. We can stop at a burger place and bring some burgers. The cable is working so we can watch a movie before going to bed.”
“That sounds great. I’ll back the car out and get some water bottles.”
“We better pick up some candy, in case we have some trick or treaters.”
“I think the town did that on Friday, Kel. We missed it.”
“We can still get candy. We can treat ourselves.”
Betsy laughed, “I am sure there is plenty of candy left at the store.”
She went outside, feeling satisfied. This was a good move. They would enjoy it here.

Later that night after they finished the burgers and movie Betsy and Kelley readied for bed. Kelley turned out the light and glanced out her bedroom window at the gentle scene that unfolded beneath it. She was happy and relaxed. This was better than seeing cars, people, and streetlights. She lay down and pulled the covers over her. Sleep came quickly, driven by good food and beer.
As the lights went out, and the two young women slept, the house was still. The two young ladies lay asleep in their beds. Outside, a full moon covered the late fall landscape with its silver blanket of light. The last of the katydids chirped in the bushes, and crickets joined them in their noisy symphony.
The spirits of the house gathered and watched the women sleep. A wave of agreement swept amongst the house spirits. They liked these young women. They would weave a protective net around them and protect them from harm.
Outside, the giant oak in the backyard shivered. The spirit that lived within it sensed changes in the autumn wind. It was an ancient spirit that had seen many changes. The spirit knew that not all changes were good.

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Sample Chapter - Gardener's Guide to Growing Potatoes in the Vegetable Garden - Potato Propagation

Potato Tubers
Potato Tubers

The tuber, or potato, is not a root. It is a modified stem. Gardeners use this tuber to propagate the plant. Gardeners may use leftover potatoes from last year’s crop, or using certified seed potatoes. It is best to use certified seed. Potatoes sold at the grocery store may also be used, but they may have viral diseases that they can transmit to the soil. Potato growers treat these potatoes with a chemical to prevent them from sprouting. Thus, they may not sprout and if they do, the potatoes may not grow well.

Potato Eye
Potato Eye
Gardener's Guide to Growing Potatoes in the Vegetable Garden
Gardener's Guide to Growing Potatoes in the Vegetable Garden
Cut the potatoes, leaving two to three eyes per section. Plant the eyes in a furrow or hole about one to two inches deep and about a foot apart about two weeks before the last frost date. The rows should be at least sixteen inches apart. They should be further apart if using a garden tiller to cultivate. Allow plenty of room so the tines don't cut the developing potatoes. The sprouts will begin to emerge from the soil in about two weeks. Potatoes can withstand a light frost with little or no damage. They do need protection from heavier frosts. The potato is a perennial in its native South American climate and the tubers can survive underground in USAD Zones 3 - 9.
Potato Sprout
Potato Sprout

Available in multiple ebook formats and softbound
Buy Paul Wonning's At:

Picker's Paradise Trader Mall
129 N Broadway Street
Greensburg, Indiana, IN 47420
(812) 663-0021

On the Square in Downtown Greensburg
Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
Mossyfeetbooks@gmail.com
Orders over $50.00 Free Shipping
Download the Mossy Feet Books catalog today for great reading.

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© 2018 Paul Wonning

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Chapter Preview - February 26, 1770 - Christopher Seider Funeral March Sparks Boston Massacre - Colonial American History Stories - 1770 - 1775

Timeline of United States History
Timeline of United States History

February 26, 1770 - Christopher Seider Funeral March Sparks Boston Massacre
Every fire needs a spark to light it. Many say that the conflagration that became the American Revolution in 1775 started with the Boston Massacre in March 1770. However, the Boston Massacre had its own spark. That spark flashed on February 26, 1770 during the funeral procession for young Christopher Seider, killed by two bullets fired from a musket held by British Loyalist Ebenezer Richardson four days earlier. Richardson had fired on a mob that formed to protest his friend's role in importing goods from England that Boston merchants had agreed to boycott. Furor over the Townsend Acts of 1787 was reaching a head.
The Townsend Acts
The Townsend Acts take their name from the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Charles Townsend. At Townsend's urging, Parliament passed these acts during the years 1765 through 1767. The two most objectionable to the Americans were the Quartering Act and the Townsend Duty Act. The Townsend Acts of 1767 had imposed taxes on many important items imported from Britain, including paper, paint, lead, glass, and tea.  Many colonists considered these taxes unlawful because the American colonies had no representation in Parliament and believed that body had no right to tax them. The duties met with widespread resistance. Parliament repealed all the taxes except the one on tea in 1770, but by that time, the Colonies were inflamed almost beyond reconciliation.
Boston Boycott
Boston merchants banded together to form a boycott of the taxed items. The boycott took effect on January 1, 1769. Some merchants in the city did not join the boycott and continued importing goods. At another meeting in October 1769, four merchants were identified as importers, John Bernard, Theophilus Lillie, John Mein and James McMasters. These men, exposed publicly, became the subject of derision. In late February 1770 some parties placed signs with the word, "Importer" written on them in front of the businesses. The sign placed in front of Theophilus Lillie's business was fated to create the spark. Ebenezer Richardson became the man that struck it.
Ebenezer Richardson (March 31, 1718 - ?)
Ebenezer Richardson was Theophilus Lillie's friend. He had noted the sign in front of his friends business and tried to induce a passing teamster to knock it down with his cart. The teamster refused. A crowd began gathering and the crowd soon became a mob, hurling rocks and insults at Richardson and Lillie. A thrown rock hit Richardson in the head.  He fled to his home with the mob following him. The mob continued throwing rocks and bricks at his house, breaking windows. Richardson grabbed a musket and ascended to a second story window that had been broken out by a thrown rock. He loaded the musket and fired several random shots into the crowd, to scare it off and disperse it. Two of the bullets struck eleven year old Christopher Seider. The boy died hours later.
The Funeral Procession
On February 22, local patriots like Samuel Adams had worked to use the incident to incite furor against the British. By the time Christopher Seider's funeral procession took place, the incident had enraged Bostonians. A crowd of almost two thousand people accompanied Seider to his grave in Granary Burying Ground. Adams declared Christopher to be "the first martyr to American liberty." There would be more. A few days later, another angry mob, incensed over the murder of young Christopher Seider, gathered around some British soldiers. The seeds of the Boston Massacre would soon sprout flames.
Timeline of United States History


Monday, January 22, 2018

Sample Chapter - Indiana's Fascinating Museums - Southeast Edition - Switzerland County Historical Museum

Indiana's Fascinating Museums - Southeast Edition

Switzerland County Historical Museum
Switzerland County Historical Museum
Housed in the former parsonage of the adjacent church, the "Life on the Ohio History Museum" displays the prominent role the Ohio River played in Switzerland County's history. Visitors can view the impressive display of riverboat models and read the stories about early residents along this beautiful river. In the era before railroads and interstate highways, the Ohio River played an irreplaceable role in transporting agricultural and other products from Indiana to faraway markets accessible only by water.
1860 Greek Revival Presbyterian Church
Switzerland County Historical Museum
Switzerland County Historical Museum
The 1860 Greek Revival Presbyterian Church, accessible by walking through a lovely flower garden, contains artifacts, photographs and documents from Switzerland County. Visitors can also see the interior of the church where members worshipped by ascending the stairway. The ornate hall tree at the head of the steps alone is worth the climb. A model of a hay press in the still unopened (July 2017) Agriculture Museum Center is on display. This hay press barn, one of only four still in existence in Switzerland County, once allowed farmers to press hay into 300-pound bales for shipment to distant markets.
Agriculture Museum Center

Switzerland County Historical Museum
Switzerland County Historical Museum

Indiana's Fascinating Museums - Southeast Edition
Indiana's Fascinating Museums - Southeast Edition
The Agriculture Museum, located on Indiana State Road 56 west of Vevay, includes the hay press barn, Thiebaud House, smokehouse, granary, gardens, an interpretive center. Built in the mid Nineteenth Century, the farm provides visitors with a time capsule view of farm life over 150 years ago. The restored farmhouse, Mormon hay press and interpretive center will open sometime in the near future.
Reading Room
The Reading Room includes articles, books and newspapers for visitors to read to learn more about the history of this beautiful area.
Book Store
The bookstore, located in the parsonage, includes many books about southeastern Indiana history and attractions.
Switzerland County Historical Museum
210 E Market St
Vevay IN  47043
http://www.switzcomuseums.org/
Switzerland County Historical Museum
Switzerland County Historical Museum


Friday, January 19, 2018

Sample Chapter - Historic Guide to Ripley County - Batesville Memorial Public Library


Batesville Memorial Public Library
Batesville Memorial Public Library
Batesville Memorial Public Library
The Batesville Town Board first approached the idea of building a library in Batesville in January 1905. The Board discussed the idea at the January 9 meeting and passed a resolution to approach the Carnegie Foundation for funds to build it on February 27, 1905. The Carnegie Foundation offered ten thousand dollars on condition that the town commit ten percent of that amount annually for the upkeep of the library. This effort failed, as did others later. By 1913, the Carnegie funds in Indiana ran out.
Historic Travel Guide to Ripley County, Indiana
Historic Travel Guide to Ripley County, Indiana
New Life
The effort to establish a new library in Batesville flared into life once again on February 23, 1928. Miss Hazel Warren, representing the Indiana State Library gave a presentation to interested Batesville citizens at the High School. Her talk, "How to Organize a Public Library" outlined different procedures a community may follow in establishing a library. In 1928, Batesville still utilized the Public Library Service, offered by the State Library. Under this system, the Indiana State Library would send a lot of books to a community for the community to use for three months. At the end of that term, the books returned to the State Library, who would then send out another lot of books. Miss Warren stated that Batesville was the largest town in Indiana still using the Public Library Service. She also noted that there were ten townships in Ripley County with no access to a library. Following this meeting, the Parents and Teachers Association began holding meetings during the remainder of 1928. The following year, a group of citizens met at the Memorial Building on April 10, 1929 to discuss plans.
Success
Finally, in 1933, the reading public of Batesville succeeded in establishing a library. The modest beginning of the library consisted of one room at the new grade school building on Mulberry Street. The library would occupy these modest digs until 1938, when room became available in the basement of the Memorial Building on Main Street. Library patrons and staff continued an ongoing campaign to obtain more space for the library. This almost happened in 1945, when three rooms on the top floor of the Memorial Building became available. The new librarian, Haze Andreas, lobbied city officials heavily for the space; however, they gave the space to the Girl Scouts instead. At about this time, Head Librarian Andreas began compiling annual reports to use to try to justify the need for more space. Meanwhile, she made do by having the shop class at the high school build more bookshelves and came up with ingenious ideas to better utilize the space she had. Her first report, in 1945, noted that the library contained 2300 books, had 246 cardholders and was open only ten and a half hours per week.
Expansion
The Girl Scouts moved into their new home at the corner of Pearl and Mulberry Street, leaving the top three rooms in the Memorial Building vacant again in 1948. This time Andreas was successful.  She gained access to these rooms and engineered the move to this more spacious area. Local businesses donated furniture for the expanded library, which would serve the Batesville public until 1974. Mrs. Andreas initiated a number of programs designed to increase library usage. These efforts included a children's story hour, reading clubs and poster contests. The effort succeeded and by the late 1960's the library again needed more space.
Batesville Memorial Public Library
The John A Hillenbrand family donated a tract of land located between Walnut Street, Schrader Street, Elm Street and Hillenbrand Avenue for a new library in 1974. The land had served as the Hillenbrand family home. Hazel Andreas, still serving as head librarian, engineered another move, to the new Batesville Memorial Public Library, which was dedicated on October 20, 1974. Mrs. Andreas retired the following February, after serving as head librarian for thirty years.
George C. and Margaret Hillenbrand Wing
By 1988, the library needed more room, so they constructed an addition that almost doubled the size of the facility. This new George C. and Margaret Hillenbrand Wing was dedicated on October 2, 1988. In 2003, the Library acquired the Cinergy office building on Boehringer Street. They allowed the Batesville Area Historical Society to use the building, now called the Library Annex, as a museum until 2007, when the BAHS moved to its current museum on George Street. The library uses the Annex to host various events and programs. Other services offered by the library include public computers, wireless internet access; meeting rooms and of course, books to read. Visitors will also find DVD's magazines, special collections and newspapers. The library also has an extensive genealogy room for local families to use to research their family trees.

Batesville Memorial Public Library
131 North Walnut Street
Batesville, IN 47006-4897
(812) 934-4706
http://ebatesville.com

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Sample Chapter - A Stranger Lurks - Chapter One - Dark Fantasy Novel

A Stranger Lurks
Paul R. Wonning
Chapter One

A Stranger Lurks
A Stranger Lurks
Memories fluttered around Margaret’s mind like the butterflies hovering over the buddleia bush. She remembered that it was her mother’s favorite flower. Those were long gone, but the fragrant sweet peas survived, covering the slope below the old house. Black eyes Susan’s, Queen Anne’s lace and other wildflowers also occupied the formerly well-kept lawn. Trees had encroached here, as well. Nature threatened to swallow up what remained of her parent’s life.
Her girlhood home had vanished in a cloud of smoke and fire. Its charred remnants remained, littering the blackened stone foundation. She turned to face the other structure that remained. The round barn built by her great grandfather remained in good shape over a century later. Its stone walls and wooden shingled roof had withstood the storms, rains and snow which nature had thrown at it.
She glanced at the watch on her wrist. He would be here soon. Their appointment was at ten o’clock and it was now five minutes before the hour. She walked down the overgrown sidewalk to her car, parked at the base of the hill below the neglected home site. The July sun was starting to beat down, promising a scorcher of a day.
The southern Indiana forested hills surrounded the old farm. It was a beautiful spot. Additionally the property was close to town and on a good road, not too far off the main highway. It should bring a good price. In some ways, she wished she could sell some of the memories with it. Some of those memories she would like to shuck off and bid farewell.
Selling this place was not something that came easy. It had been in the family for generations. Another glance at the unkempt lawn and fields told the story, though. It was time to let go. She could not keep it up anymore and since the death of her mother, she had lost interest.
The crunch of rubber tires on the gravel driveway announced the arrival of the realtor. He was on time, anyway. She watched as his car bounced down the driveway and pull up beside hers. His arrival marked the end of another chapter of her life. Another would soon open.

Reuben Steen slowed down as he approached the driveway and turned in. He saw that the seller was there awaiting him. Behind her, he could see the old round barn. It was an imposing structure that dominated the scene before him.
He slowed still more as his car bounced. The neglected driveway had grown a good crop of potholes and muddy water splashed over his newly washed car.
Damn, he would have to have it washed again.
His mood brightened as he drew up beside the other car and saw the attractive brunette who awaited him. He had seen her before in the diner he frequented and also at the library. He had not known her name, but now he did.
He opened the door and smiled as he extended his hand.
“Margaret Dreu? My name is Reuben Steen,” he said as he shook the smooth, firm hand she extended to him.
“Yes, I am Margaret Drue,” she replied. “But my friends all call me Peggy.”
“Nice to meet you, Peggy,” Reuben said. “I think I have seen you working in the library.”
“Yes, I handle the kid’s reading programs so I mostly work afternoons and evenings. However, through the summer we switch to a daytime program. I think I have seen you in the library at times in the evening.”
“Yes, I sometimes go in there for research. The courthouse closes at four o’clock. Sometimes I can find the information I need for a property in the old town records in the library. I think I have also seen you in Benny’s Diner.”
“I like to eat breakfast in there. He has some divine Danish rolls. Wanda recommended you to me when I told her I wanted to sell the old farm. She said you sold her brother’s house and he liked you.”
“I will have to give Wanda a bigger tip the next time I go in there.”
“Yes, you will. I am sorry about the driveway but I haven’t been maintaining it. A few months back someone set fire to the house. I thought if the driveway was in bad shape it might deter other trespassers.”
Reuben glanced up the slope at the burned out farmhouse.
“Darn shame,” he said. “It was probably just kids out on a lark.”
“The house was pretty well shot, anyway. No one lived in it for years. I took an apartment in town when Mom moved out and to the nursing home. I needed to be near her. This was too big a place for me to rattle around in anyway. It has become a party place for the local kids. I guess I will have to put up a locked gate to keep them out.”
“At least they didn’t burn this barn. This is a great building. You don’t see many round barns around anymore. I love the windmill on top.”
“My great-grandfather built this barn around 1900. Purdue University was touting it at the time as a great time saver. Grandfather added the windmill later on. He laid a pipe from the well by the house. The windmill pumped water into some big water tanks on the third level. A pipe fed water back to the house. We had great water pressure.”
“Ingenious,” said Reuben. “Does the windmill still work?”
“As far as I know it does. I don’t know about the pump. The water company laid water lines past here a few years back, so there is city water available making the well unnecessary. It is still up by the house, though.”
Reuben pulled a notepad from his pocket and jotted it down, saying, “I will take notes as we go.”
Peggy opened the door and Reuben followed her inside.
“It is wonderful in here. The stone foundation keeps it nice and cool,” said Reuben.
“They built the first level into the side of the hill which rises behind the barn. It is always cool in here in the summer, and warm in the winter.”
Reuben turned in a slow circle, taking it all in.
“It is like a huge, circular tunnel.”
“This lower level was where we kept the livestock. This outer circle goes all the way around the stable area. You can see the openings for the stalls. They pulled wagons in here to load manure on. You could run the cattle around from one stall to another without going out into the weather. You could also run a team of horses around it without having to back up. Of course, my dad had a tractor. It wasn’t on of the big ones you see now. It was small enough to navigate around in here.”
“This was one efficient barn.”
“Yes it was. But the one reason my great grandfather built it he wouldn’t talk about much.”
“What was that?”
“It was an old superstition. The old timers said that in a round barn there weren’t any corners for evil spirits to hide in.”
Reuben laughed and said, “That would be true. There are no corners in here.”
As they walked, one stall door was open. Reuben glanced inside.
“This is the one my father died in. He was forking manure out into the spreader when he died. Mom found him when he didn’t come in for lunch.”
Reuben glanced at a pitchfork that stood against the one wall.
“He left it right there. He had a heart attack. None of us felt like moving that fork, so it is right there where he left it. Mom sold the cows after he died.”
“This place holds some bad memories for you, then?”
“It does. However, it holds many good ones too. One of our cats had kittens in that manger. I wouldn’t let Dad use it until they were big enough to move.”
She smiled, her voice deep in memory, “It was my favorite cat. She was a big calico I named Butterboot, because she was white and black with huge yellow splotches and white boots.”
“It does sound like there were good ones then, too.”
“We were happy here when I was a girl. It is the later ones that are bad. Dad died. Then Mom took sick and I had to take care of her. An aunt moved in to help when I went to college. I moved back after college. Then my aunt got sick and died after that. Mom had a bad stroke and had to go to the nursing home. I moved into town to be near her. That was three years ago and Mom has since passed on. It has set empty ever since. And as you can see, it is too much for me to take care of. So I decided to sell it.”
“I will try my best,” said Reuben. “But it is a slow market right now. It may take some time.”
“I understand,” said Peggy.
They walked down a passageway to the center of the barn.
“This was the feeding area,” Peggy said. There are chutes which they dumped the grain and feed down here, and hay and they lowered the straw using a winch fastened on the roof.”
They climbed a spiral staircase that rose to the second level.
“This floor has a ground level door. They brought the wagons in here for unloading. They raised the hay to the haymow with a winch. They stored grain in the second level.”
“It sounds like an efficient way to farm.”
“It was. Dad still used it. But now, with the larger equipment and different way of housing the animals, it is obsolete.”
Reuben again turned in a circle, studying the barn.
“It looks like the structure is still good. It seems to be the old mortis and tendon construction.”
“It is all native timber.”
Reuben wrote some more in his notepad, musing “I can see this having commercial applications. It would make a great winery. This second level could be a restaurant, tasting room and gift shop.”
“I had the same thought.” Peggy replied with a smile. “It looks like we are on the same page.”
“I think we are,” said Reuben. “I bet there is a great view from up there?”
“There is,” said Peggy as she began ascending the stair. Soon they were looking out one of the windows at the hilly landscape that surrounded the barn.
“This is a great piece of property,” said Reuben. “I would like to get it on the market as soon as possible.”
He looked at the center of the barn. There is where the water tank was. There was a large enclosure near the tank. A door, fastened with a latch, faced him.
“What’s in there?”
“That is where the pump was, as well as tools and other things they needed up here. It still has everything in it, as far as I know.”
Reuben pulled on the latch. The door would not budge. “
“It must be stuck,” he said.
“It shouldn’t be.”
Peggy tugged on the door, but it remained jammed.
“H’mm. It seems to be stuck pretty well,” she said.
“I will have to come back later,” said Reuben. “I forgot my camera. I think I left it by my computer at home. I will bring a few tools along and see if I can get it open. I would like to see that pump.”
The two moved back to the window.
“I will draw up the contract this afternoon,” said Reuben. “Can you stop by the office tomorrow morning to look it over and sign it?”
“I don’t go to work until one o’clock. I can stop by in the morning.”
“Great. Let’s say around 10:30, is that okay?”
Peggy nodded. “I will stop on the way to work.”
“Good. I will get the photos later tonight, and if we can get the paperwork done in the morning I can have it listed by afternoon.”
“That sounds great. The sooner the better,” said Peggy. “It may sound crazy, but the last time I came in here a few days ago, I was alone. It seemed that I felt an evil presence here. I haven't come back until now." She shuddered visibly.
The two walked back down the staircase and back to their cars. They stood talking for a while, as Peggy indicated the property lines and told him more things about the property.
After a bit more conversation, they got in their cars and both bounced out the driveway and into town.

In the enclosure in the haymow, the reason the door wouldn’t open waited. As he heard the car doors close, he opened the door and walked to the outer edge of the barn. He watched as the cars drove out the driveway.
It was she. His Margaret. She looked just the same as she looked many years before. That man would be coming back. He would be waiting.
Evil does not always need a corner in which to hide.

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Sample Chapter - Gardeners Guide to Growing Green Beans - Legumes Nitrogen-fixing Ability

Gardeners Guide to Growing Green Beans
Gardeners Guide to Growing Green Beans
Nitrogen-fixing ability
Peas, and other legumes garden plants like beans, have the ability to take nitrogen in the atmosphere and fix it in the soil in which they grow. The plants do this by using bacteria located in nodules on the plants roots. This symbiotic relationship is beneficial to both the legumes and the bacteria. The bacteria take nitrogen from the oxygen and, by a complex chemical process, convert it to ammonia. Ammonia is nitrogen in a form that plants can use it. The plants pay the bacteria back by supplying sugars to the bacteria that it needs to survive. The bacteria are a special kind called Rhizobium bacteria. The bacteria are specific to the plant, thus the Rhizobium bacteria that peas need are a different species from the ones that beans require. This bacteria is usually present in garden soil.
Deficiencies of Rhizobium
If the type of legume you are planting has not been planted in the garden before, if it is a new plot or you have not planted the plant before it is possible that these bacteria are not present. Using chemical fertilizers or pesticides can also kill the bacteria. To ensure that the bacteria are present, you may coat the seed with an innoculant that contains the correct bacteria at seed planting time. The innoculant sold in garden stores and mail order seed supply companies usually contain a mix of bacteria that will inoculate most garden crops. These inoculants are inexpensive. The inoculants will have an expiration date and must be stored properly for them to survive. The species needed for most garden crops are:
Common Beans - R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli
Field or Garden Peas - R. leguminosarum bv. viciae
Peanut - Bradyrhizobium sp.
Chickpeas - Mesorhizobium sp.
Soybeans - Bradyrhizobium japonicum
To use, moisten the seed and dust the innoculant over it. mix it in well and plant immediately. You can also sprinkle the innoculant into the soil where you are planting the seeds. Work it in well. Some seeds are pre-inoculated, so check the seed packet, which will state it on the package if it is. Store unused innoculant in a sealed plastic bag in an area with consistent temperatures. A refrigerator will work. Properly stored, the innoculant should keep for a year.
temperatures. A refrigerator will work. Properly stored, the innoculant should keep for a year.
Legume crops like peas and beans will fix more nitrogen in the soil than they need. This nitrogen is available for future crops grown in the garden and can reduce fertilizer for other vegetables. Farmers have taken advantage of this nitrogen fixing ability for generations by rotating legume crops with other field crops.
Garden Culture:
After planting, bush beans will need little care other than to check for insect pests or disease every few days. Pole beans will need some sort of support to climb. An extra feeding of manure, compost or diluted liquid fertilizer can benefit beans. Apply it about halfway through the growing season.

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April 19, 1763 - Teedyuscung, King of the Delaware, Murdered in His Home - Sample Chapter - Colonial American History Stories - 1763 – 1769

Colonial American History Stories - 1763 - 1769
Colonial American History Stories - 1763 - 1769
April 19, 1763 - Teedyuscung, King of the Delaware, Murdered in His Home 
Teedyuscung, the self-proclaimed "King of the Delaware," had been one of the chiefs involved in the treaty negotiations at the Treaty of Eastwick in 1758. He had fought hard to obtain peace for his people and a permanent home in the Wyoming Valley. In exchange for his work for peace, he demanded that the Wyoming Valley be set aside as a permanent home for his tribe and other natives, that had filtered into the area.
Wyoming Valley
The crescent shaped valley, formed by a depression in the Appalachian Mountain, occupies northeastern Pennsylvania. The cities of Scranton and Wilkes-Barre occupy the central area. The Susquehanna River flows through its southern region. The name derives from a Delaware (Lenape) phrase meaning "at the smaller river hills." At the beginning of the French and Indian War bands of various tribes, including the Lenape, Mohican, and Shawnee had moved into the region. The Iroquois had driven the Lenape into the area and dominated the region. During this period, many peoples quarreled over this desirable land, including New York, the Iroquois, the Delaware, Pennsylvania and others.
Treaty of Eastwick 
The Treaty of Eastwick, signed on October 26, 1758, was an attempt by the British to keep many of the tribes out of the French and Indian War. As per the terms of the treaty, the British promised to honor the native's hunting lands in the Ohio River Valley. The twelve-day conference that led to the agreement was filled with many disagreements. Teedyuscung managed to extract his wish of the Wyoming Valley as a place of refuge. It came at a cost. The Iroquois managed to reduce his influence and maintain dominance of the area.
Teedyuscung's Death
Competing interests among the various elements that desired the Wyoming Valley prevented Teedyuscung's peace from developing. When the French and Indian War ended in February 1763, tensions rose. Teedyuscung's influence had declined, but many still considered him a danger. On April 19, 1763 arsonists burned his cabin and the accompanying village of Wyolutimunk that had grown up around it. The Lenape drifted away from the area as another conflict for control of the area between competing white interests in the region waxed.



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Monday, January 15, 2018

Jefferson County Historical Society Museum - Sample Chapter - Sample Chapter Indiana's Fascinating Museums - Southeast Edition

Jefferson County Historical Society Museum

Jefferson County Historical Society Museum
Jefferson County Historical Society Museum
Indiana's Fascinating Museums - Southeast Edition
Indiana's Fascinating Museums - Southeast Edition
The Jefferson County Historical Society is located in heart of the National Historic Landmark District of downtown Madison, Indiana. Madison is well known for its preserved 19th century architecture, railroad history, and its beautiful riverfront on the Ohio River. It was once a busy steamboat port, and was the terminus of the Madison and Indianapolis Railroad, the first railroad in Indiana. Located at the corner of 1st and Vine Streets, the Jefferson County Historical Society Museum uses hundreds of photographs, artifacts, documents and displays to interpret the history of Jefferson County, Madison and surrounding communities.
Jefferson County and Madison
The Indiana Territorial Legislature formed Jefferson County on November 23, 1810, making it one of the oldest counties in Indiana. The county's name derives from the second President of the United States, Thomas Jefferson. Surveyors platted the county seat on April 1, 1809, naming it Madison, after the Father of the Constitution, James Madison. The first land sales took place in May 1808 and the first lots sold in 1811. Settlement in the new area went quickly after this.
Incorporation and Growth
Madison incorporated in 1809, seven years before Indiana became a state. Its location along the Ohio River caused it to become an important town in the early state's history. The state's first major highway was the Michigan Road, commissioned in 1828. Construction began that year and the road was completed in 1834. The Michigan Road, later to become State Road 29, ran from Madison, Indiana to Michigan City on Lake Michigan in the north, passing through Indianapolis. US 421 today follows the route, though sections of the original road still exist. In 1836 the Madison & Indianapolis Railroad was completed, connecting the growing city with the new state capital. Therefore, by the 1840's, Madison was connected to the northern part of the state by road and rail. Jefferson County Historical Society Museum

Jefferson County Historical Society Museum
Jefferson County Historical Society Museum
Visitors to Madison will enjoy a day spent perusing the sprawling 10,000 square foot museum. Museum staff has prepared an excellent layout using well-written descriptive signage to allow visitors to browse through the museum and learn the regions rich history. Madison and Jefferson County played a major role in the early state's development. The city served as a river port that allowed area farmers to ship their products to the faraway markets down the Mississippi River. Visitors will find extensive, well-designed displays describing the industries, transportation and agricultural roots of the area. The museum, located across the street from the Lanier Mansion, serves as the ticket counter for the museum. All tours of the mansion begin at the museum.
1895 Vintage Railroad Station
This gem is located between the museum and the Lanier Mansion. Admission to the museum includes a visit to the passenger depot. Inside the depot, visitors can see the station much as it appeared in 1895 when residents and visitors used the train to travel around the state and country. The highlight of the station is a train layout/diorama depicting Madison and the famous Incline and Cut.
The Caboose
On the far end of the museum grounds visitors can see what the inside of a caboose was like. Museum staff will, on request, provide a short guided tour of the inside.
Jefferson County Historical Society

Jefferson County Historical Society Museum
Jefferson County Historical Society Museum
Originally chartered in 1850, the Jefferson County Historical Society became the Lanier Memorial Museum after Charles Lanier deeded the property to them in April 1917. The Society maintained the mansion as a museum until they deeded it to the State of Indiana in 1925. The Society changed its name to the Lanier Memorial Museum Society after Charles Lanier donated the Colby House/Colonial Inn for use as a museum and meeting place. Members changed the name back to the Jefferson County Historical Society after dedicating the new Lanier Memorial Museum in 1928. In 1986, the Society purchased the 1895 Vintage Railroad Station and opened their new museum in the building in 1991. Continued growth saw the Society break ground on the current 10,000 square foot museum in 1998. At almost two acres, the museum includes the display rooms, a 1,600 square foot public meeting room and museum store.

Jefferson County Historical Society Museum
Jefferson County Historical Society Museum
Jefferson County Historical Society
615 W. First St.
Madison, Indiana 47250
812-265-2335
http://www.jchshc.org/
http://www.facebook.com/jchshc

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