Sunday, March 31, 2019

Transplanted Cabbage Seedlings

Sunday, March 31, 2019

Transplanted Cabbage Seedlings
Gardeners Guide to Growing
Cabbage in the Vegetable Garden
On Saturday, March 30 I transplanted the cabbage, broccoli, kohlrabi and Chinese cabbage seedlings into larger containers. I used toilet paper tubes I have cut in half as seedling pots. These are biodegradable, so I can plant them right into the garden. The tubes disappear and become part of the garden soil. I use cardboard boxes I cut down to fit into a seed flat to keep the potting soil from sifting through the bottom of the flat. After use, they also break down, so I just tear them up and incorporate them into the garden soil. The potting soil I use is compost from the worm farm. I dump kitchen scraps, all vegetable parts like coffee grounds, lettuce leaves and other vegetable waste from the kitchen which the worms turn into nutrient rich compost. I will write more on that later. I need to build a new worm bin later this spring and will share that with you as I do it. The seedlings are a bit long legged, as I kept them in the germination chamber longer than I should have. They will grow out of that and become nice strong seedlings in a few weeks. Right now, the weather is too cold to put them out, so I will keep them in the tool shed for a day or two and move them to the garden under the row cover.

Thursday, March 28, 2019

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums Series Box Set




Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums Series Box Set
The nine books in this history guide series help the traveler visit the historic markers, museums and sites in every region of Indiana.
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - Southeast Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - Southwest Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - East Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - West Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - North East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums North Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums North West Edition

Available in the Catalog
A $135 Value
$99.00
Free Shipping

Radishes Germinating

Thursday, March 28, 2019
Radishes Germinating
The protection provided by the spun bond row cover placed on the raised garden beds has enabled the radishes to germinate, about fourteen days after planting. They have actually been up for a couple of days, however I did not get around to documenting them until yesterday.


Gardener's Guide to the Radish



Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Indiana State Park Travel Guide Series Box Set

Indiana State Park Travel Guide Series
Indiana State Park Travel Guide Series 
The Indiana State Park Travel Guide Series will encompass all the family friendly Indiana State Parks. Indiana’s State Park system is one of the finest in the United States. With great hiking trails, history, and nature, there is something for everyone at an Indiana State Park. This boxed set includes the complete 13 volume set:
A Visit to Pokagon State Park, Indiana
A Visit to the Falls of the Ohio
A Visit to the Land of Lincoln, Indiana
A Visit to Harmonie State Park, Indiana
A Visit to Brown County State Park
A Visit to Spring Mill State Park
A Visit to Clifty Falls State Park
A Visit to O'Bannon Woods State Park and Corydon Indiana
A Visit to Versailles State Park
A Visit to Turkey Run State Park
A Visit to McCormick's Creek State Park
A Visit to Chain o' Lakes State Park
A Visit to Indiana Dunes State Park

Indiana State Park Travel Guide Series 
The Indiana State Park Travel Guide Series will encompass all the family friendly Indiana State Parks. Indiana’s State Park system is one of the finest in the United States. With great hiking trails, history, and nature, there is something for everyone at an Indiana State Park. This boxed set includes the complete 13 volume set
Available in the Catalog
A $90.00 Value for 
$75.00
Free Shipping


Buy Paul Wonning's At:

Picker's Paradise Trader Mall
129 N Broadway Street
Greensburg, Indiana, IN 47420
(812) 663-0021

On the Square in Downtown Greensburg

The Bookshelf
101 N Walnut St,
Batesville, IN 47006

(812) 934-5800
bookshelf101@hotmail.com
Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
Mossyfeetbooks@gmail.com
Orders over $50.00 Free Shipping
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Lettuce Seeds Germinating

Wednesday, March 27, 2019
Lettuce Seeds Germinating
In spite of the cold weather we have been having, the lettuce seedlings I planted on March 11 have begun to germinate under the protection of the spun bond row cover. Soon, I hope to see the radishes, onions and carrots germinating.
Gardeners' Guide Book Growing and
Harvesting Lettuce


Thursday, March 21, 2019

Indiana Association of Home Educator's Convention Display

Indiana Association of Home Educator's Convention Display
I am set up and ready to go at the Indiana Association of Home Educator's Convention in Indianapolis. The convention runs Friday, March 22 and 23, 8:00 AM - 6:30 PM. I will be there all day, both day.



Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Indiana History Time Line Boxed Set

Indiana History Time Line Boxed Set

Indiana’s Timeless Tales - Pre-History to 1781
Discover Indiana’s history as it unfolds from pre-history until the beginning of the American experiment. The Indiana History Time Line Series presents the unfolding saga of Indiana’s fascinating history in an easy to follow time line. Readers will learn both famous and forgotten, obscure events in Indiana’s story.

Indiana’s Timeless Tales - 1782 - 1791
Indiana’s Timeless Tales - 1782 - 1791 is a fascinating time line of events in the Northwest Territory that occurred before Indiana was a state. This volume covers events from the inception of the Northwest Territory until the tragic events surrounding St. Claire's Defeat. 

This boxed set includes both volumes and a comprehensive lesson plan that includes an answer sheet. Students will learn in depth Hoosier History. The lesson plan also includes a short list of field trip possibilities that relate to the subject matter of the books. 
List Price for Both Books - $25.98
Box Set Price - $24.99
Free Shipping if ordered from the Author

Indiana Association of Home Educator's Convention

Indiana Association of Home Educator's Convention
This weekend I will attend the Indiana Association of Home Educator's annual convention at the Indiana State Fairgrounds in Indianapolis. Although I have attended many craft shows with my book display, this is the first time I will attend an event of this nature. In addition to keeping up with my various writing projects, I have busied myself with printing product catalogs, signs and other promotional literature. A home school parent at a show I attended in February suggested that I create lesson plans for some of my books. Not being a teacher, I was mystified as to what a lesson plan was. Some internet research provided an answer, so I designed a lesson plan for the first two volumes of my Indiana’s Timeless Tales series. The project took quite a bit of time and right now I am unsure of the result. However, I have printed them off and enclosed them in folders, which I will offer as a box set with the two books. Life is an adventure, so we will see how this little experiment turns out.
Indiana’s Timeless Tales - Pre-History to 1781
Indiana’s Timeless Tales - Pre-History to 1781




















Buy Paul Wonning's At:

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129 N Broadway Street
Greensburg, Indiana, IN 47420
(812) 663-0021

On the Square in Downtown Greensburg

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101 N Walnut St,
Batesville, IN 47006

(812) 934-5800
bookshelf101@hotmail.com
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Monday, March 18, 2019

Peas Planted

Peas Planted
Yesterday I planted peas in the garden. Since peas like cool weather and tend to wilt once hot weather makes its appearance, it is best to get peas planted as early in the season as possible. The pea seed will germinate in cool soil and the pea plant will withstand light freezes. Some years I have had a light covering of snow over seedlings, which saw little damage from the cold. This year, I planted the peas and covered them with some of the spun bond row cover. I have planted both the sweet snap peas and shelling peas.

Gardeners' Guide to Growing Peas
Both go well raw, in salads and lightly steamed. This should allow faster germination as well as foster faster growth once the peas germinate. So far this spring I have planted 1/2 bed as the spring salad garden, which includes several varieties of lettuce, some spinach and radishes, 1 bed of peas and 1/2 bed of potatoes.

Sunday, March 17, 2019

This Year's Garden Plan

This Year's Garden Plan
Each year I prepare a plan on how I will lay out the year's garden. The plan is not "set in stone," so to speak, but gives me a general idea of what I want to plant where. It also provides me with a record for next year so I don't plant a bed with the same vegetable two years in a row. Rotating crops in the garden helps cut down on disease problems. I print out a copy and keep in my potting shed for reference throughout the year.
Raised Beds
I used raised beds for several reasons, which include:
Allow earlier access to the garden in inclement weather
Easier on the back and knees than a standard row garden
Easier to apply mulches, which build the soil, conserve moisture and help
control weeds
Keep me from compacting the garden soil by not walking on the growing beds
The beds make it unnecessary for me to have expensive equipment like garden tillers, etc. I never till the soil, just rake it with a hand cultivator or trowel.
Gardeners Guide to Growing Vegetables

Cabbage Up and Growing

Cabbage Up and Growing
The cabbage seeds I planted last Sunday in the greenhouse have germinated and are up and growing. I took the propagation dome off the seed flats and have covered the pepper, anise and celery seed with plastic to keep them humid. Since I have mice in the tool shed I placed a metal screen cover over the flat to keep the little varmints out.
Gardeners Guide to Growing Cabbage in the Vegetable Garden


Thursday, March 14, 2019

Potato Experiment

Potato Experiment
Yesterday I started an experiment in planting potatoes. Last year I grew Kennebec potatoes in the garden and had a pretty good harvest. The potatoes lasted us until sometime in January. The last of these potatoes had transformed into shrunken vestiges of their former selves. The eyes of the potatoes had started to grow, so I cut them into wedges and let them dry on some dishes in the kitchen. We cooked the portions of the potatoes I cut the wedges from. They were good, by the way.
Planting the Potatoes
Gardener's Guide to Growing Potatoes
in the Vegetable Garden
By yesterday the potato wedges had dried, but
still looked alive. I had prepared a raised bed by covering it with a composted leaf and grass clipping mulch. I just took a trowel and cut a hole in the mulch and planted the potatoes about two inches deep in the soil under the mulch. Then I covered the bed with some of the spun bond fiber.
Will they grow? I don't know. That is part of the fun of gardening, trying different things and seeing if they work.

Buy Paul Wonning's At:

Picker's Paradise Trader Mall

129 N Broadway Street
Greensburg, Indiana, IN 47420
(812) 663-0021

On the Square in Downtown Greensburg

The Bookshelf
101 N Walnut St,
Batesville, IN 47006

(812) 934-5800
bookshelf101@hotmail.com
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Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Sample Chapter - A Visit to Brown County State Park - Ramp Creek Covered Bridge


Ramp Creek Covered Bridge

A Visit to Brown County State Park
Ramp Creek is Indiana’s oldest covered bridge built in 1838 by Henry Wolf. It’s the only Double Tunnel Bridge in Indiana and one of four in the United States. The DNR moved it from Putnam County in 1932 from its location on Ramp Creek. It now crosses Salt Creek at Brown County State Park. It is a single span burr arch truss design. The bridge is 110 feet long, including 7 foot overhangs. The portal width of both lanes is eleven feet wide and twelve feet high.
The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places
The bridge is on the North Gate Entrance and all vehicles must go through it. Tall vehicles or cars with bikes on top may not make it through. If your vehicle will not clear, you will have to use the West Gate Entrance located west of Nashville on Highway 46.
Buy Paul Wonning's At:

Picker's Paradise Trader Mall
129 N Broadway Street
Greensburg, Indiana, IN 47420
(812) 663-0021

On the Square in Downtown Greensburg

The Bookshelf
101 N Walnut St,
Batesville, IN 47006

(812) 934-5800
bookshelf101@hotmail.com
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© 2019 Paul Wonning

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Sample Chapter - A Visit to Harmonie State Park, Indiana - The Wabash River

Wabash River At Harmonie State Park

The name Wabash derives from the Shawnee word "waapaahšiiki." The word means, "It shines white," in that language. The name is in reference to the river's limestone bottom. The bottom shone white in the sunlight in the time that the Shawnee roamed the lands surrounding the river. Since then, the river has silted up and in most places; the river bottom no longer "shines white." The French, who were the first European settlers in Indiana, called it the "Ouabache." The English spelling became Wabash, the name used today. The Wabash is just a little over five hundred miles long, beginning in Ohio near a little town called Fort Recovery. Here at Harmonie State Park the river is about nine hundred feet wide and, depending upon the river stage, about ten feet deep.
It enters Indiana at Mile 28, approximately five miles east of Geneva, Indiana. It flows on a southwest from the state line, crossing the entire width of Indiana. The State of Indiana has designated the Wabash as its state river. Southwest of the city of Terre Haute, the Wabash becomes the boundary between Indiana and Illinois. It serves as the border for the rest of its length.   There are places where the river has deviated from its original course that the state line is not the middle of the river.  However, both Illinois and Indiana consider the middle of the Wabash as the boundary line.
A Visit to Harmonie State Park, Indiana
Wabash River Picnic Area.
The Wabash River forms the western boundary of Harmonie State Park. From the Wabash River Picnic Area Mink Island is visible to the north. The sunset can be spectacular from this picnic area. The ever-changing hues of the setting sun reflect in the gentle waters of the river as it flows by. Trail 2 from the cabins and campground allow overnight visitors to the park to hike down to the picnic area. There are restrooms, a shelter and picnic tables here at the picnic area.
Wabash River Public Boat Access
Just south of the Wabash River Picnic Area the DNR maintains a public access for boats to the Wabash. A trail connects the picnic area to the public access site. Anglers can try the waters of the river from this trail, provided they possess an Indiana State Fishing License.
Buy Paul Wonning's At:

Picker's Paradise Trader Mall
129 N Broadway Street
Greensburg, Indiana, IN 47420
(812) 663-0021

On the Square in Downtown Greensburg

The Bookshelf
101 N Walnut St,
Batesville, IN 47006

(812) 934-5800
bookshelf101@hotmail.com
Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
Mossyfeetbooks@gmail.com
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Monday, March 11, 2019

First Crops in the Garden

Monday, March 11, 2019
First Crops in the Garden
Vegetables planted in the garden in early March are always risky; however the gardener can take steps to reduce the risk. Protection of the tender seedlings from weather extremes is critical if they are to survive. I have found one of the best materials to use is spun bond row cover materials. These products provide a surprising degree of protection, despite their fragile appearance. They are translucent, so they allow light through them. They are also porous, so rainfall goes through them. And despite their delicate appearance, the ones I have used will last several seasons, even with feeble attempts to preserve them.

The first crops I planted under spun bond row cover on March 10, 2019 were:
Lettuce Varieties:
Winter Density - 28 - 54 Days to Maturity
Beleah Rose - 35 Days to Maturity
New Red Fire - 45 Days to Maturity
Black Seeded Simpson - 46 Days to Maturity
Tennis Ball - 50 Days to Maturity
All the Year Round - 53 Days to Maturity
Different Maturities
Gardeners Guide to Growing Vegetables
Note that like cabbage, I have chosen lettuces having different maturity dates. This stretches out the harvest for an extended period of time. I plant small quantities, only rows of about two feet long, of each cultivar. I will use succession cropping to extend the season even further. I will plant lettuce, carrots, spinach, and later beets, over an extended period to ensure a constant supply. I will stop planting lettuce about mid May, as later crops will bolt due to the heat. I will pick up planting lettuce again in mid to late August for a fall crop. Carrots I will plant small quantities through the season and into early autumn. Carrots will survive until spring with some
protection.
Other crops planted at this time:
Radish - Cherry Bell - 21 Days to Maturity
Spinach - Matador - 50 Days to Maturity
Onions - Yellow Sweet Spanish - 110 Days to Maturity
Carrot - Scarlet Nantes - 70 Days to Maturity

Sunday, March 10, 2019

First Crops in the Greenhouse

First Crops in the Greenhouse
This morning I planted the first seeds in the greenhouse. Well, it is not really a greenhouse, however it works. I have a tool shed with a translucent fiberglass roof that admits enough light for me to start seedlings. This is the first year I have used this set-up, so we will see how it works. This first planting is mainly Brassicae crops, cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli. I use a seedling mat that produces a gentle bottom heat to the seed flat that should germinate the seeds quickly and evenly.

The seeds I started included:
Broccoli - Di Cico - 55 - 70 Days to Maturity
Gonzales Mini - 55 Days to Maturity
Red Express - 60 Days to Maturity
Early Jersey Wakefield - 60 - 75 Days to Maturity
Danish Ballhead - 90 Days to Maturity
Cabbage - Chinese - Soloist - 49 Days to Maturity
Cauliflower - Early Snowball - 55 Days to Maturity
Kohlrabi - Early White Vienna - 50 Days to Maturity

Gardeners Guide to Growing Vegetables
As you can see, I plant a variety of cultivars that will ensure me an extended harvest of cabbage that should extend over most of the summer. In addition to the Brassicae cultivars I also started:
Celery - Golden Self Blanching - 105 Days to Maturity
Pepper - Sweet - 70 Days to Maturity
Pepper - Hot Anaheim - Days to Maturity
In addition to this, I planted some lettuce and other early vegetables in a garden bed that I covered with spun bond row cover. I will write more on that tomorrow.

Saturday, March 9, 2019

Getting Ready to Garden

Getting Ready to Garden
The seeds have all arrived and I am getting ready to start planting. The weather has been cold and snowy, but it appears that Old Man Winter is preparing to give way to early spring. The snow has melted and now is the time to begin planting the early crops. I have prepared my crop list for this year and will schedule it, probably later today or tomorrow.
Gardeners Guide to Growing Vegetables
Here is the garden crop list for this year. The heading DOM means Days of Maturity and refers to the number of days the crop takes to r
each maturity.

Bean - Bush - Stringless Green Pod – 50 90 Days to Maturity
Beans – Dry
Cranberry - 75 - 90 Days to Maturity - Bush - Open Pollinated
Black Turtle - 100 days to Maturity - Bush - Open Pollinated
Dark Red Kidney - 95 Days to Maturity - Bush - Open Pollinated
Pinto - 100 Days to Maturity - Bush - Open Pollinated
Jacob's Cattle - 83 Days to Maturity - Bush - Open Pollinated
Coco Noir - 75 Days to Maturity - Bush - Open Pollinated
Marfax - 83 Days to Maturity - Bush - Open Pollinated
Beet - Early Wonder - 55 Days to Maturity
Broccoli - Di Cico - 55 - 70 Days to Maturity - Heirloom
Brussels Sprouts - Long Island Improved – 110 Days to Maturity
Cabbage
Gonzales Mini - 55 Days to Maturity - Open Pollinated
Red Express - 60 Days to Maturity - Open Pollinated
Early Jersey Wakefield - 60 - 75 Days to Maturity - Heirloom
Danish Ballhead - 90 Days to Maturity - Open Pollinated
Cabbage - Chinese - Soloist - 49 Days to Maturity - Hybrid
Carrot - Scarlet Nantes - 70 Days to Maturity
Cauliflower - Early Snowball - 55 Days to Maturity - Heirloom
Celery - Golden Self Blanching - 105 Days to Maturity - Heirloom
Cucumber - Bush Crop - Bush - 55 Days to Maturity
Kale - Improved Dwarf Siberian - 50 Days to Maturity - Open Pollinated
Kohlrabi - Early White Vienna - 50 Days to Maturity
Lettuce
Winter Density - 28 - 54 Days to Maturity
Beleah Rose - 35 Days to Maturity
New Red Fire - 45 Days to Maturity
Black Seeded Simpson - 46 Days to Maturity
Tennis Ball - 50 Days to Maturity
All the Year Round - 53 Days to Maturity
Melons
Minnesota Midget Cantaloupe - 60 Days to Maturity - Bush - Heirloom
Sugar Baby Watermelon - 80 Days to Maturity - Bush - Heirloom
Onions - Yellow Sweet Spanish - 110 Days to Maturity
Pea - Shelling - Tom Thumb - 50 - 55 Days to Maturity - Bush - Heirloom
Pea - Sugar - Sugar Bon - 56 Days to Maturity
Pepper - Sweet - King of the North - 70 Days to Maturity - Heirloom
Pepper - Hot - Anaheim
Potato - Kennebec
Radish - Cherry Bell - 21 Days to Maturity Heirloom
Spinach - Matador - 50 Days to Maturity
Squash - Black Zucchini - 50 Days to Maturity - Bush - Heirloom
Jack Be Little Pumpkin - 105 Days to Maturity - Bush - Heirloom
Butterbaby - Winter Squash - Bush - Open Pollinated
Sweet Potato
Tomato
Long Keeper - 70 Days to Maturity - Open Pollinated
Gills All Purpose - 80 Days to Maturity - Open Pollinated
Julliette - 60 Days to Maturity
Turnip - Shogoin - 80 Days to Maturity

Monday, March 4, 2019

Sample Chapter - A Visit to the Land of Lincoln, Indiana - Nancy Hanks Grave

Sample Chapter - A Visit to the Land of Lincoln, Indiana 
Nancy Hanks Grave

Nancy Hanks Grave
Across from the Memorial, a long forest lined alee stretches towards a small graveyard. Visible from the Museum, a flagpole marks the somber spot. We walked along the sidewalk towards the flagpole. Behind it, nestled in the quiet forest we can see the Pioneer Cemetery. Several graves mark the forest floor, the most prominent being a modest white stone marker. This is the grave of Nancy Hanks Lincoln, mother of Abraham Lincoln, the Sixteenth President of the United States.
Nancy Hanks and Thomas Lincoln Marry
Mrs. Lincoln was born on February 5, 1784 in what is now West Virginia. She married Thomas Lincoln on June 12, 1806 in the home of her guardian, Richard Berry, in Springfield, Kentucky. Together they produced two children, Sarah on February 10, 1807 and Abraham on February 12, 1809. Mrs. Lincoln encouraged young Abraham in what little formal education he got. She also taught him his "letters" and helped him acquire the books he lusted after as a young boy growing up.
The Move to Indiana
A Visit to the Land of Lincoln, Indiana
The Lincoln family moved to southern Indiana in 1816. Two years later, she died of "milk sickness." Her husband buried her here, just a short distance from their cabin. He marked the spot with a wooden marker. The marker rotted away over the years and for many years, this grave lay unmarked. The permanent marker that now marks her resting place was placed in 1879, fourteen years after the assassination of her son.
Milk Sickness
The milk sickness was caused by drinking milk contaminated by a poison from the plant, white snakeroot. Cattle that eat the plant transmit it through their flesh and milk, poisoning any that consumes it. No one knew the cause of the disease during this time. It was not until Anna Pierce Hobbs Bixby, known as Dr. Anne, discovered the source of the disease in the 1860's. She discovered the cause after conversations with an old Cherokee woman. After her research, preventative measures were possible.
Serenity
We linger by her grave, struck by the serenity of the place, before moving on to our next destination, the Pioneer Homestead.
Buy Paul Wonning's At:

Picker's Paradise Trader Mall
129 N Broadway Street
Greensburg, Indiana, IN 47420
(812) 663-0021

On the Square in Downtown Greensburg

The Bookshelf
101 N Walnut St,
Batesville, IN 47006

(812) 934-5800
bookshelf101@hotmail.com
Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
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© 2019 Paul Wonning

Sunday, March 3, 2019

Focus on Ripley County Photographers Show - Central House - Napoleon



Focus on Ripley County Photographers Show
Ye Olde Central House - Napoleon, Indiana
Ye Olde Central House in Napoleon, Indiana has sponsored an event called the Focus on Ripley County Photographers Show at their facility in Napoleon. The event features the works of sixteen local photographers in a three room
exhibit. Now is a great time for area residents to check out the fabulous work done by these camera jockeys. While you are there, ask for a flyer that lists the rest of the events that will take place during 2019.
These events include:
Spring Tea - April 6
Derby Party and Hat Show - April 27
Jane Austin Tea Party - June 22
Quilt Show - July 13 - 14.
Garden Party - August 24
Annual Murder Mystery Dinner - October 11, 12
Photos with Santa - December 7
The Focus on Ripley County Photographers Show runs until March 10. Contact Ye Old Central House Facebook page, listed below, for more information.
Napoleon Central House
Also known as Tavern Inn
State Road 229, east of intersection with US Route 421
Napoleon

Historic Travel Guide to
 Ripley County
The former Tavern Inn is situated on an early stagecoach route from Cincinnati to Indianapolis. Probably built sometime in the 1820's, the Central House is a familiar Napoleon landmark. The two story Federal style structure has six rooms, three upstairs and three downstairs. This type of architecture is common in the eastern United States; however it is rare in Indiana.  One of several inns in Napoleon during the early years of the Nineteenth Century, the building serves as a reminder of Napoleon's importance early in its history. The National Register of Historic Places listed the Central House on September 23, 1982.
Ye Olde Central House
3684 W Napoleon Main Street
Napoleon, Indiana
Ye Olde Central House - Napoleon, Indiana


Friday, March 1, 2019

Sample Chapter - Falls of the Ohio State Park



Falls of the Ohio State Park

A Visit to the Falls of the Ohio
At 165 acres, Falls of the Ohio State Park is the smallest of Indiana's state parks. The park resides in the town of Clarksville, Indiana just across the river from Louisville, Kentucky.  The Falls of the Ohio were a series of rapids that allowed the river to fall twenty-six feet in a little over two and a half miles. These rapids presented early river travelers with the only obstacle on the 981-mile course of the river. By the early 1800's attempts to circumvent them were already under way. Today the McAlpine dam obscures most of the cascades while raising the river level for better navigation. The park includes an Interpretive Center, the Devonian fossil bed and hiking trails. A picnic area, public access to the Ohio River and the George Rogers Clark Homesite are also in the park. The park falls within the 1400 acre Falls of the Ohio National Wildlife Conservation Area. The State of Indiana established the Falls of the Ohio State Park in 1990 to preserve the fossil beds that lay exposed on the riverbed. As the 20th Indiana State Park, The Falls of the Ohio specializes in public interpretation and education about the fossils.

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Buy Paul Wonning's At:

Picker's Paradise Trader Mall

129 N Broadway Street
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(812) 663-0021

On the Square in Downtown Greensburg

The Bookshelf
101 N Walnut St,
Batesville, IN 47006

(812) 934-5800
bookshelf101@hotmail.com
Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
Mossyfeetbooks@gmail.com
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