Wednesday, August 1, 2018

A History of the Telephone

A History of the Telephone

A History of the Telephone
A History of the Telephone

The telephone has come a long way from the primitive “Lover’s Phones” invented in 1667 to today’s sophisticated cell phone and satellite communication systems.

Sunday, July 22, 2018

Sample Chapter - Campout - A Dark Fantasy Novel - Chapter 1

Campout
A Dark Fantasy Novel
Chapter 1

Campout
Campout
Johnny Berg pressed down on the brake pedal, bringing his bike to a rasping halt as the tire scratched a deep gash in the gravel. The smell of fresh mown summer hay from the field on one side of the road filled his nostrils. The June heat of summer had brought a fresh coating of perspiration to wet his shirt. Summer vacation was just starting and already the boys were searching for fresh adventures. Johnny was twelve and at an age that adventures came readily to mind.
His friend, Jim Wester stopped beside him. Jim was a couple of years younger than Johnny, however, the boys hung together because they were neighbors and the only boys that lived along the rural highway that went past their houses.
The boys peered through the summer heat at an abandoned road that poked into the forest, disappearing in a mysterious shadow of darkness.
"Let's go down that road, Jim," Johnny said.
"Wow, you can hardly tell it’s a road, Johnny."
"It's an old county road that has not been used in a long time. It goes through to the road that the Hicks farm is located on."
Jim nodded and replied, "I know where it comes out. The other end is as overgrown as this end is. I wonder why they stopped using it."
"It goes through Laughery Creek," said Johnny. "Old Charley Nudson said there was a little town back there at one time, right along the creek."
"It looks like its open enough to ride our bikes through," said Jim.
"Some of the farmers use it to get to the back of their farms," Johnny said.
"Have you ever been back there, Johnny?"
Johnny shook his head and answered, "Nope. Grandpa was telling me the other day that him and his friends used to go back once in a while to swim in the creek. But they stopped after a while."
"Why did they stop?"
Johnny hesitated, and then said, "He didn't really say. Let’s go on back. I want to see that swimming hole."
With that, Johnny pedaled off and entered the road with Jim in close pursuit.
The burst of speed did not last long. The roadbed began to descend into the creek valley and became a series of rock ledges that the bikes could not negotiate easily. There were briars and roots obstructing their path. They had to stop frequently to lower the bikes down from one ledge to another.
"Apparently the tractors don't come back this far, Johnny," Jim observed as he stopped to survey the abandoned road ahead of them.
"Apparently not," Johnny said in answer. "We are almost down the creek, though."
Indeed, they could see water ahead of them through the underbrush.
The rest of the way down was a bit easier as the terrain leveled out as they reached the creek.
"There is the crossing," said Johnny, pointing to a spot below them. "They slip scraped the banks away. You can see the road continue on the other side of the creek."
Jim nodded as he wondered, "I wonder where the old town was."
"I don't know. Charley said all that is left are stone pillars they used for foundations for some of the buildings and a couple of boarded up old wells."
"The boards on the wells will be rotted away by now, Johnny."
"Uh, huh," the boy agreed as he dismounted his bike. He flipped the kickstand down and rested it on the bedrock slab they were standing on.
"Lets see if we can find it."
Jim extended his kickstand, put his bike beside Johnny’s, and followed the older boy as he plunged into the forest beside the old road. In just a moment he stopped.
"Here it is," he said, pointing to a rectangular configuration of stone pillars that jutted up from the forest floor. There were several other remains of similar type scattered along the old road.
"It looks like there may have only been three or four buildings here," said Johnny.
"There may have been some on the other side of the road," Jim said as he surveyed the area.
"Maybe. We can look later."
Johnny walked to the edge of the bank and peered down musing, "This would be a great place for our summer camp out, Jim."
"It would, but it is a bit hard to get to."
"We can work on the road, Jim. I saw some spots that we can make it easier to get our bikes down."
"That would be a lot of work, Johnny."
"We have all summer, Jim. We usually have our big camp out in August. That gives us almost two months to get a campsite ready down here. Heck, we can camp down here ourselves a couple of times."
Jim nodded and said, "It does sound like fun if our parents let us." His face clouded at the thought.
Johnny glanced at Jim saying, "We can't tell our parents," he said. They won't let us camp down here. We have to keep this place secret. It can be our own little hideaway."
Jim's face lightened as he said, "That would be neat. No one comes here. We can make a secret camp here. But what about your grandpa? We have to ride past his place to get here."
Johnny thought a moment before saying, "We can work down here on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. Grandpa always goes into town to see his friend Bill Watson on those days. They spend the afternoon talking and always go out for supper at The Dinner Bell and he doesn't get home until at least seven o'clock. That gives up plenty of time to ride over, get his tools and return them before supper."
Jim nodded and said, "I like that plan. We should do it."
The two boys walked about the abandoned town. At length Johnny stopped on a level area near a huge beech tree.
"We can put the tent up here, on this bank overlooking the creek. There is a pretty good hole there that I bet is chock full of bluegill," Johnny said.
"Yup, we can catch some fish and cook them over the fire. I see a good spot for a campfire on that sandbar. There are a lot of old logs and limbs to use for firewood and we can swim in there when we are done fishing."
"This is going to be a great spot, Jim. I can't wait."
The afternoon was wearing on and the two boys had finished their exploration.
As they got on their bikes, Jim glanced back towards the deserted town and asked, "I wonder why they abandoned this town."
Johnny shrugged as he replied, "Charley Nudson said that something scared the people off. He didn't say what."
Jim shot a quick glance at Johnny and queried, "You mean this place is haunted?"
Johnny, knowing Jim's aversion to all things supernatural, said carefully, "He didn't say haunted. He just said something scared the people off. But that was a long time ago, Jim. This place has been deserted for a hundred years. The log cabins that were here have rotted away and all the wooden structures are gone. Whatever scared them is gone a long time ago."
He glanced at his friend and observed, "This will be a great place for our camp out, Jim."
Jim, with an unsure smile on his face said, "Yeah, it will. When do you want to start working on that road?"
"Tomorrow. I can't wait to get us a path down here."
Their summer project set, the two boys made their way slowly back up the road.
The beech tree near where the boys had laid their plans held a secret of its own. Its innards had, over the many years it stood here, hollowed out, forming a cavernous crevice within it. This crevice, dark and damp, was large enough to hide a person. From this crevice, a figure stepped out and watched as the boys moved off. It watched as they faded from view, listening to the creaking of the bicycle chains as they strained from their labors of propelling the boys up the hill.
The eyes were not happy at this intrusion.

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Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Home Water Systems

Home Water Systems
Home Water Systems

Home Water Systems
Home Water Systems is a primer for the homeowner about water sources like lakes, streams and wells. It provides a basic overview of water filtration systems, wells and other water sources for the home.

Sunday, July 15, 2018

Sample Chapter - Colonial American History Stories - 1665 - 1753 - Girls Accused of Witchcraft in Salem - 1692

Colonial American History Stories - 1665 - 1753
Colonial American History Stories - 1665 - 1753
February 29, 1692 - Sarah Good, Sarah Osborne and Tituba Accused Of Witchcraft in Salem, Massachusetts
On February 29, 1692, Judge John Hathorne issued warrants for Tituba, a slave, for practicing witchcraft. The next day magistrates examined her at Nathaniel Ingersoll's tavern in Salem Village. The testimony delivered during this examination would set Salem Village on edge. It would also launch the infamous Salem Witch Trials.
Tituba
The first accused was a slave owned by Rev. Samuel Parris. Historians have speculated more about her than they have actually established as fact. Many think she had roots in an Arawak Village in South America, from which she was abducted and sold as a slave. Others think she had African origins because her name appears to be Yoruba. These people live in southwestern Nigeria in Africa. They do know that Reverend Parris purchased her in Barbados when he lived there. He also purchased two other slaves, John Indian and a boy whose name has escaped history. She was the first accused and the first to confess to the crime of witchcraft. Many say that her owner, Reverend Parris, beat her until she confessed.
Sarah Osborne
Sarah Osborn was a widow of Robert Prince, who had died in 1674, leaving her with three children, Joseph, James, and Elizabeth. Robert's sister had married into the powerful Putnam family. After his death, legal problems from this family afflicted her. The community considered her an outcast. This was because she had not attended church in almost three years because of a long illness. The judge signed her arrest warrant on March 1, 1692. The authorities arrested her and sent her to a Boston jail for the duration of the trials.
Sarah Good
Sarah Good was also the product of unfortunate circumstances. Her father had been wealthy, but she had not received any inheritance from him when he died in 1672. Her marriage to Daniel Poole left her with huge debts when he died. Her new husband, William Good, could not handle the debt. Reduced to poverty and homelessness, they begged for work, food, and shelter.
The Accusations
Three local girls, Abigail Williams, Ann Putnam Jr. and Betty Parris, became ill in early 1692. Their symptoms included involuntary convulsions. While convulsing their eyes rolled into the back of their heads and their mouth hung open. The girls asserted that something pinched, bit and abused them during these episodes. A local doctor and a minister examined the three girls. They diagnosed that an “Evil Hand” caused the girl’s afflictions. The girls accused Tituba as the source of their problems.
The Examination
After her arrest, Tabita accused Sarah Good and Sarah Osborne as being in league with her during her interrogation. With the prospect of three witches living in their midst, the townspeople began a massive witch-hunt. During the hysteria that followed many fantastic accusations flew about. The authorities arrested many other men and women during this troubled time.
The Trials
The trials began with the initial accusations in February 1692 and concluded in May 1693. The trials eventually consumed over twenty men and women in several area towns. Nineteen received hanging as their sentence. One died of being "prest to death,." This execution method consisted of an accused held on the ground while someone put heavy objects on their chest. They increased the weights until the accused either confessed or died. Five people died in jail awaiting trial. Sarah Good and Sarah Osborn were hanged. Because she had confessed, Tabita never went to trial and was not hanged. After the trials, an unknown person paid her jail fees and took her away. She has disappeared from history.

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Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Gardener's Guide to Growing Garden Salad Greens

Gardener's Guide to Growing Garden Salad Greens

Gardener's Guide to Growing Garden Salad Greens
Gardener's Guide to Growing Garden Salad Greens


Description:
 Gardener's Guide to Growing Garden Salad Greens introduces the home gardener to some of the lesser-known crops they may grow in their vegetable garden. The book covers spinach, Mizuna, Mache, chicory, endive, cress, arugula and mesclun mixes.

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Monday, May 7, 2018

Campout

Campout
Campout



Description:
An abandoned town, a forgotten graveyard and sleeping demons waiting to trap the unwary await a group of teens preparing for a memorable summer campout.
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Monday, April 30, 2018

Indiana’s Timeless Tales - Pre-History to 1781


Description:

Discover Indiana's history as it unfolds from pre-history until the beginning of the American experiment. Indiana's Timeless Tales - Pre-History to 1781 presents the unfolding saga of Indiana's fascinating history in an easy to follow time line. Readers will learn both famous and forgotten, obscure events in Indiana's story.

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Monday, April 16, 2018

A Guide to Indiana State Parks

  A Guide to Indiana State Parks

A Guide to Indiana State Parks




Description:
Many visitors consider the Indiana State Park system to be one of the best in the United States. A Guide to Indiana State Parks introduces readers to the wonderful amenities available to Indiana State Parks. Readers will find out camping, fishing, hiking, lodging and picnicking information about all of Indiana’s wonderful parks. Learn the history of the individual parks and the Indiana State Park system as well as the story of each of the twenty-eight state parks. Search Terms: lodging, picnicking, fishing, camping, hiking

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Thursday, March 29, 2018

The Wizard King

The Wizard King
Description:
The Pirate Kingdom had fallen, foiling Gault’s plan to use it to establish his Wizard Kingdom. Never mind, the evil wizard developed a new plan to impose his Magic Kingdom.  

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Monday, March 19, 2018

Sample Chapter - Parke County Covered Bridge Auto Trails - McAllister Covered Bridge

McAllister Covered Bridge

McAllister Covered Bridge - Parke County, Indiana
McAllister Covered Bridge - Parke County, Indiana
Located on County Road 400S a little over a half mile from Bridgeton Road.
Constructed by Joseph Albert Britton in 1914, this 125 foot long Burr arch-truss bridge spans Little Raccoon Creek. The National Register of Historic Places listed the bridge on December 22, 1978. The bridge was restored in 1977.
Parke County Covered Bridge Auto Trails
Parke County Covered Bridge Auto Trails
Joseph Albert Britton (June 9, 1838 – Jan. 18, 1929)
The son of Charlton and Julia Britton, Joseph was native to Rockville, Indiana. He spent his boyhood in a log cabin while his father taught him the carpenter trade. Known locally as J.A. Britton, Joseph constructed over 40 covered bridges in Parke, Putnam, and Vermillion counties during a 33-year period.
Civil War Prisoner of War
After the outbreak of the Civil War, Brittan enlisted in the Eighty-fifth Indiana Infantry, Company A. The Confederates surrounded his company during their first engagement on March 5, 1863 and captured them. The Confederates held them until March 31 at Libbey Prison. On that day, they took part in a prisoner exchange and returned to combat. The Company returned to action and mustered out June 12, 1865. After leaving the army, Britton read law and gained admittance to the Indiana and Kansas bars. He practiced in Kansas, but decided he did not like law practice. Thus, he returned to Rockville and took up carpentry, building houses until around 1879. He started building covered bridges in that year, and would continue building for another 33 years. His first contract for a bridge came in 1882. This was the Narrow's Bridge that is now in Turkey Run State park. He preferred the short, Burr Arch Trussone span bridges. Many of his bridges are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Britton would marry twice, the first time to Mary E. Jones on Sep 25, 1862. Mary died in 1884 and he married Bertha Hirshbruner on September 13, 1888. He would have eight sons and four daughters. Several of his sons entered the bridge building business.
Joseph Albert Britton died in 1929 and is interred in Rockville Cemetery.

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Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Sample Chapter - Gardener's Guide to Growing Onions in the Vegetable Garden - Onion Garden Culture:

Onion Garden Culture:

Onion Garden Culture:
Onion Garden Culture:
Gardener's Guide to Growing Onions in the Vegetable Garden
Gardener's Guide to Growing 
Onions in the Vegetable Garden
Plant onion sets shallow, with the tops exposed. Onion plants should be no more than one inch deep. As the onions grow, the bulb exposes itself about the soil. It is best to allow this, as it will help keep the onion from rotting as it matures. Use well rotted compost or a slow release fertilizer at planting. Onions will deplete the fertilizer as they grow. Onions that mature in the less fertile soil should be sweeter than onions that still have fertilizer available to them. Use organic mulch like shredded leaves or grass clippings to reduce weeds and conserve soil moisture. Keep the onions watered well, as they have shallow roots and cannot delve deep for water. Do not allow the soil to become soggy, as that will induce rot. Pencil size onion plants will produce the best onions. Larger ones may go to seed while smaller ones will stay small. Plant both the larger and smaller seedlings close together and harvest in a few weeks as green onions.

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Monday, March 12, 2018

Sample Chapter - Driving the Canals and Rivers Auto Trail - Duck Creek Aqueduct - Franklin County Historical Marker

Duck Creek Aqueduct - Franklin County Historical Marker

Duck Creek Aqueduct - Franklin County Historical Marker
Duck Creek Aqueduct - Franklin County Historical Marker
Erected by:
National Historical Civil Engineering Landmark 1992
Located: 
South of Canal, East End of Main Street, Metamora, Indiana (#11 on Metamora Map)
Text and History:   
Duck Creek Aqueduct is the only aqueduct that remains of over a hundred that once existed in the U.S.  The poplar trusses rest on limestone abutments, the siding is also poplar and the roof would originally have been shingled.  The aqueduct was built in 1843, destroyed by flood and rebuilt in 1847.  The floor now has a metal sheathing over the planked bed.   The two openings on each side release water into Duck Creek and help control the water level of the canal.

Driving the Canals and Rivers  Auto Trail
Driving the Canals and Rivers  Auto Trail
Brief History by the Author
The Duck Creek Aqueduct is the oldest covered bridge style aqueduct remaining in the United States. Constructed by the Whitewater Canal Company, the structure replaced the original open trough aqueduct that washed out in a flood in 1847. The builder of the bridge used a covered bridge that was under construction and adapted it to the current design. The aqueduct carries the waters of the Whitewater Canal over Duck Creek before it empties into the Whitewater River.  It measures approximately ninety feet long, twenty-five feet wide, and twenty-five feet deep. The aqueduct deteriorated through disuse and abandonment. The state of Indiana restored it to the present condition in 1949, a project begun in 1946. The National Register of Historic Places listed it in 2014.
Whitewater Canal Company
Authorized by the Internal Improvements Act of 1836, the State of Indiana authorized the company to build the Whitewater Canal. The company formed because of a meeting from representatives from Dearborn, Fayette, Franklin, Randolph, Union, and Wayne counties in 1822. They appointed seven commissioners to oversee the company. The company sold 40,000 shares of stock at $25 per share. The State of Indiana granted the Company 1.4 million dollars in the budget of the Internal Improvements Act of 1836.

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Thursday, March 8, 2018

Sample Chapter - Ten Fantastic Fantasy Tales - Benny, Benny, Short as a Penny

Benny, Benny, Short as a Penny

From:
Ten Fantastic Fantasy Tales
Ten Fantastic Fantasy Tales
Ten Fantastic Fantasy Tales

Modern technology be damned. Benny first shook the machine and then pounded on the side of it with his fist. What was taking so long? Did that dratted contraption have to mint the coins first?
He bent over and peered in the coin slot of the dollar changer in the seedy little Laundromat at the edge of town. In the dim light inside the machine, he saw, no that was impossible. He straightened up, closed his eyes and rubbed them. Blinking to clear his sight, he bent to peer in the coin slot again.
He really had seen it.
There was a small table with four little men seated around it, playing cards in the confined space of the interior. A little whiskey bottle, half-empty, occupied the center of the table. The men were all dressed in green and sported long beards. Two were smoking little black cigars.
Benny stood up and glanced over his shoulder. He could see his car idling by the curb outside. He needed that change for the condom machine in the restroom. He finally had Billy Rae in the mood, and now this blamed change machine was messing with him. He bent over again, pounded on the side of the machine again and shouted, “I want my change. You bunch of little creeps are gumming up the works. Get out of the way and let it give me my change.”
At this, one of the little men stood up, put down his cards, stuck his cigar in his mouth and stomped over to the hole.  He peered out at Benny's eyeball.
“We are on break, crap wad. You have to wait until break time is over. Then you will get your stinking change.”
“I want my change now, you little toads.”
“We are leprechauns, for your information, not toads. You will get your change when we are darn good and ready to give it to you, ding head.” The leprechaun blew a puff of smoke out through the coin slot into Benny’s eye.
Benny drew back cursing, his eye watering in pain.
“That does it,” he said, kicking the machine and pounding on it harder. “I want my change. Since when do I have to wait on a bunch of little toilet paper tubes to get my change? Who left you mouse turds in charge?”
“Yeah, we are in charge of dispensing the change. Everyone thinks these machines are marvels of technology, but it is us leprechauns who make it all work. We also handle vending machines, and the hand dryers in restrooms. We control those supposedly automatic urinals, too.” At this, the little guy stopped talking and looked at Benny through the slot in the hole.
“Hey, I know you. My cousin Vince operates the urinal in your office. I know all about you.”
“What do you mean you know all about me?”
“Hey guys,” shouted the leprechaun. “This is the fellow Vince was telling us about. Remember, ‘Benny, Benny, short as a penny.’ This is the guy.”
The other leprechauns roared with laughter. One of them held up his thumb and forefinger about a half-inch apart and yelled, “Benny, Benny, short as a penny.”
The other leprechauns guffawed, slapping their knees, tears streaming from their eyes.
Angered by the sassy leprechauns, Benny started pounding on the machine and swearing at it. A policeman happened to walk by the door and watched the display for a few minutes. He opened the door and walked over to Benny.
“Are you having a problem, sir?”
Benny turned around and saw the policeman.
“The leprechauns in there won’t give me my change. They are a bunch of thieves. They took my dollar and won’t give me my change.” Benny stomped his foot in anger.
The police officer looked at Benny. Then he looked at the changer.
“Leprechauns? Thieves? No change?”
The policeman inched closer and sniffed Benny's breath. His suspicious eye fastened on Benny. “Have you been drinking?”
Benny backed away. “I have had one or two beers. But I am not drunk.”
“H’mm, I think you had better come downtown with me.”
The policeman cuffed Benny and led him from the Laundromat.
The leprechauns returned to their card game, still laughing with glee. The officer led Benny past Billy Rae. She watched with widened eyes from Benny’s car as the policeman put him in the police cruiser.
Benny’s cheeks burned in shame. Leprechauns had humiliated him. Before his girlfriend's watchful gaze the policemen handcuffed him and led him away. And those little mouse turd leprechauns had kept his dollar. He hoped that they wouldn't mention his deficiency to Billie Rae.

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Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Sample Chapter - Gardener's Guide to Growing Sweet Potatoes - Sweet Potato Propagation:Sweet Potato Propagation:

Sweet Potato Propagation:
Sweet Potato Propagation:
Sweet Potato Propagation:
Gardener's Guide to Growing Sweet Potatoes
Gardener's Guide to Growing Sweet Potatoes
The most common way to propagate sweet potatoes is by cuttings. Gardeners can purchase rooted cuttings in the spring from a nursery. They can also half submerge a sweet potato tuber in a glass of water by sticking three toothpicks in the side and suspending the root half in and half out of the water. In a few weeks sprouts will emerge which can be removed and rooted in moist potting medium or in water. Plant the rooted cuttings after all danger of frost has passed in the spring. Gardeners can also take cuttings from established plants in the garden in early fall. Root these and plant in a pot in a sunroom or sunny window. To root, cut the stem into sections with a leaf in each section. Submerge the leaf axil in moist potting soil and keep moist. In a couple of weeks, these should be rooted. Plant them in a pot, grow these all winter indoors, and pinch back in late winter. The plants should do well in a sunroom or south facing window. Do not allow them to freeze. New shoots will appear. Root these shoots in moist potting soil when they are two to three inches long and plant in the garden. Gardeners can also take whole potatoes that have sprouted in the spring and plant them directly in the garden. Cut the roots into sections, with each section containing at least one sprout. The sweet potato will sometimes flower and produce seed. Plant hybridizers use the seed to develop new varieties. Be careful if handling sweet potato seed as it is quite toxic.

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Sample Chapter - A Year of Colonial American History - Book – 1 - January 7, 1698 - Fire Destroys Jamestown Virginia

A Year of Colonial American History - Book – 1
A Year of Colonial American History - Book – 1

January 7, 1698 - Fire Destroys Jamestown Virginia 
After its establishment in May of 1607, the colonists in Jamestown faced a harrowing existence. Salt poisoning from the briny river water they drank, dysentery and typhoid ravaged the men of the colony. The relationship with the surrounding native tribes ranged from hostility to reluctant friendship. There was the constant threat of attack by the Spanish, who often explored the area. Their arrival coincided with the beginning of a seven-year drought, thus adding to their difficulties.
A Commercial Venture
Since the settlement was primarily a commercial venture, the men had not expected to hunt or grow food. They expected provisions from England or trade for supplies with the local native tribes. These men did not wish to spend time hunting or growing crops. Additionally, the directive from the King that the first five years be an experiment in communal living had failed. They depended upon the exploration and scavenging ability of Captain John Smith, whom a few months earlier, they had condemned to death for accused insurrection. Only the intervention of Bartholomew Gosnold saved his life, but they kept him in shackles. They only released him upon discovery that his name was on a list of seven names, handpicked in England and placed in a sealed box. This list named him a member of the seven-member council that would lead the colony.
Progress
In spite of the difficulties, by January 1608 the men managed to build a storehouse, church, and several houses. They surrounded this settlement with a log palisade for protection from the Spanish and the native tribes.
Capture
Captain John Smith engaged in frequent explorations of the area surrounding them. He usually returned with corn and other foodstuffs acquired by trade or theft from the Algonquin tribes. It was on one of these missions that a party of Powhatan captured Smith after killing his two companions. The Powhatan chief threatened to kill Smith also. This was the fabled encounter with Pocahontas. Smith later claimed the eleven-year-old girl saved his life.
Return
They allowed him to return after agreeing to give the colonists food in exchange for iron hatchets and copper trinkets.
Condemned Again
When he returned, what remained of the population accused him of causing his companions death. The Council condemned him to death.
Supply Ship Returns
Captain Christopher Newport, after leaving the previous summer to gather supplies, returned. Captain Newport found a colony in collapse. Of the original 104 men, only 38 survived and of these, only ten were able to work. Disease and hunger had so weakened the rest that they could not walk. One of the leaders, John Smith, was under sentence of death and food was in short supply. His ship’s arrival with fresh supplies and a new contingent of colonists revived the colony.
Disaster
Then, on January 7, a few days after the ship arrived, disaster struck. A spark somewhere in the colony started a fire. It took little time for the fire to spread and consume the buildings, the new supplies and the fort.
Captain Smith again saved the colony by returning to the Powhatans and negotiating for food and supplies.
Perseverance
The colony persevered, rebuilding the buildings and the fort by spring. The colonists eventually elected Smith leader of the colony and it was his leadership that saved the colony.

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Monday, March 5, 2018

Sample Chapter - January 3, 1838 - Indiana Pottery Company Petitions Legislature for Land in Troy - A Year of Indiana History - Book 1

A Year of Indiana History - Book 1
A Year of Indiana History - Book 1
January 3, 1838 - Indiana Pottery Company Petitions Legislature for Land in Troy
The towns along the Ohio River became the first important commercial centers during the early part of the Nineteenth Century. Troy, Indiana was one of these towns and in 1838, Reuben Bates’ Indiana Pottery Company promised more economic development for the growing town.
Troy, Indiana
The first white settlers landed at the confluence of the Anderson and Ohio Rivers in 1800. The early settlers found a good landing spot for the boats, ample wood for fires and plenty of water and game in the hills. A man named Captain Tarascon probably gave the new settlement its name, Troy. Legend says that this was because there was an attractive Indian maiden there that reminded him of Helen of Troy. Surveyor Samuel Moore surveyed the town of Troy on 120 acres on August 15, 1815. The town became the seat of newly formed Perry County in 1815. The town included about twenty houses by 1818, Mr. Reuben Bates being one of the first inhabitants. Another local legend is that Troy is where the Lincoln family came across from Kentucky in 1816. According to local lore, Thomas Lincoln stayed in the town awhile, tending the ferryboat that crossed over to Kentucky. The Lincolns departed for Spencer County in the fall of 1817. This lore also indicates that young Abraham Lincoln departed from Troy on a flatboat for New Orleans in 1828. It was that flatboat journey in which Lincoln first saw a slave auction and vowed to end the practice. Many other Ohio River communities claim to be where the Lincoln’s came in, however, so whether this is true or not, no one can tell.
Reuben Bates
Mr. Bates opened the first store around 1818. He packed pork into barrels and shipped the meat, along with corn and other grains by flatboat to New Orleans. From New Orleans, he purchased sugar and other goods for his store. By the 1830's he was one of the leading businessmen of Troy.
Indiana Pottery Company
The area around Troy contains coal deposits. Many felt that the clay that under laid the coal seam was suitable to make white queens ware pottery. Interest rose in pottery making and Bates petitioned for land for a pottery company and received his charter in 1838. Bates brought potters from Europe make the pottery. After about a year it was determined that this clay was not suitable for the queensware pottery. It was suitable for making yellow clay ware. Samuel Cassidy of Louisville, Kentucky took over and ran the company until 1851, making the yellow clay ware that became known as Troy Ware. The company did not succeed and in 1851, Samuel Wilson and John Sanders bought it out. They continued making pottery until around 1863 when another pottery company opened. This one lasted until the 1870's when it failed.

Available in multiple ebook formats and softbound
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(812) 663-0021

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© 2018 Paul Wonning