Saturday, April 25, 2020

Sample Chapter - A History of Batesville, Indiana - Batesville Area Historical Society Museum

Sample Chapter
A History of Batesville, Indiana
Batesville Area Historical Society Museum
The Batesville Area Historical Society formed on May 20, 1999, with new Batesville resident Doug Evans spearheading the group, which included Judy Tonges and Jean Struewing . Mr. Evans served as the organizations first president, followed by Jean Streuwing in 2000. Mrs. Struewing served as president for many years. On August 18, 2008, BAHS purchased the historic house on George Street and transformed it into its museum, a function it serves today.
Batesville Area Historical Society
The BAHS met monthly, most times at the Batesville Memorial Public Library. Some meetings took place at other sites of historic interest to the community. Many of the early meetings featured speakers or demonstrations of historic interest to the members.
Batesville Area Historical Society Museum
The first museum operated by BAHS operated in a vacant store structure on Main Street during Batesville's 2002 Sesquicentennial year. After the year of celebration, the Batesville Memorial Public Library agreed to allow BAHS to operate a museum in a building it had purchased on Boehringer Street. This facility opened in 2003. It would remain open until BMPL needed the building, forcing BAHS to put the displays into storage.
Batesville Area Historical Society Museum
BAHS member Elsa Soderberg provided a substantial donation to BAHS to establish a museum in Batesville. On August 18, 2008, BAHS purchased the historic home on George Street to use as a museum. John O. Kaiser, who had established a tavern in Batesville in 1899, had built the home around 1910. The home's original location was on the site of the current Post Office. It had been moved to its current location when the post office relocated there in 1937. The structure has served as a home and medical office until BAHS purchased it. The structure features a mural painted by students of the 2002 Batesville High School art class and the wood basketball floor from the old Batesville High School Gym.
The first floor of the museum features special exhibits hosted by the museum during the year and the upper floor displays from local businesses in Batesville.
For more information, contact:
Batesville Area Historical Society
15 West George Street
812-934-3266
http://www.batesvilleareahistoricalsociety.org/

Monday, April 20, 2020

Short History of Railroads- Indiana Edition


Description:
Learn about the first United States train robbery as well the story of Indiana's trains, electric traction railways and accidents. The book includes an extensive listing of train museums in the Hoosier State.
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Other Books in the Series
Short History of Libraries, Printing and Language - Indiana Edition
Short History of Fire Fighting - Indiana Edition
Short History of Railroads- Indiana Edition


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Indiana’s Timeless Tales - The Indiana Territory - Book 1


Indiana’s Timeless Tales  - The Indiana Territory - Book 1

Description:
Explore the beginning years of the Indiana Territory
To be published sometime in late 2020

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Preview Chapter 1

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© 2020 Paul Wonning

Sunday, April 19, 2020

Sample Chapter 1776 - Book 1 - June 18, 1776 - William Franklin Arrested


Sample Chapter
An American Revolution Time Line - 1776
Timeline of United States History
June 18, 1776 - William Franklin Arrested
The New Jersey Provincial Congress declares Benjamin Franklin's Son, William "an enemy to the liberties of this country..." and had him arrested.
William Franklin (c.1730 – November 1813) 
Benjamin Franklin never divulged the identity of William's mother. When Benjamin and Deborah Reed entered into their common law marriage on September 1, 1730, she accepted William as her son. Father and son participated in many projects together, included the famed kite experiment in 1752. William enlisted in the militia to fight in King George's War (1744–1748), rising to the rank of captain. He and Benjamin went on some of Ben's journeys together. William traveled to England in 1759 to study law. After gaining admission to the bar in England, Benjamin managed to procure an appointment for his son as governor of New Jersey.
September 09, 1763 - William Franklin Appointed as New Jersey Governor
William Franklin received appointment at New Jersey's last colonial governor while living in England.
Appointment as Governor
He and  Elizabeth Downes married that same year and in September William recieved appointment as the Royal Governor of New Jersey. Historians speculate on whether Benjamin helped him get the appointment, or he gained it on his own. At any rate, he and Elizabeth moved to New Jersey, where he would live until the early stages of the American revolution.
November 10, 1766 - Charter for Queen's College Signed
The eighth of nine Colonial Colleges sprang to life when New Jersey Governor William Franklin signed the charter on November 10, 1766. The efforts by Reverands Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen and Jacob Rutsen Hardenbergh had paid off with the establishment of the college. The men created to all male college to train ministers for the Dutch Reformed Church. The college would later change its name to Rutgers University.
The last Colonial governor of New Jersey, William Franklin, signs the charter of Queen's College (later renamed Rutgers University).
May 6, 1775 - New Jersey Royal Governor William Franklin Reports to Earl of Dartmouth - Little Chance of Reconciliation
Benjamin Franklin and his son William chose different courses during the early stages of the American Revolution. The father chose to course of independence, William the course of reconciliation. The different choices led to a permanent rending of their once close relationship. On May 6, 1776 William wrote the British Secretary of State for the colonies, William Legge, the Earl of Dartmouth, that after the battles of Lexington and Concord, that there was little chance of reconciliation between the colonies and Britain.
September 09, 1763 - William Franklin Appointed as New Jersey Governor
William Franklin received appointment at New Jersey's last colonial governor while living in England.
Appointment as Governor
He and  Elizabeth Downes married that same year and in September William received appointment as the Royal Governor of New Jersey. Historians speculate on whether Benjamin helped him get the appointment, or he gained it on his own. At any rate, he and Elizabeth moved to New Jersey, where he would live until the early stages of the American revolution.
November 10, 1766 - Charter for Queen's College Signed
The eighth of nine Colonial Colleges sprang to life when New Jersey Governor William Franklin signed the charter on November 10, 1766. The efforts by Reverends Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen and Jacob Rutsen Hardenbergh had paid off with the establishment of the college. The men created to all male college to train ministers for the Dutch Reformed Church. The college would later change its name to Rutgers University.
The last Colonial governor of New Jersey, William Franklin, signs the charter of Queen's College (later renamed Rutgers University).
May 6, 1775 - New Jersey Royal Governor William Franklin Reports to Earl of Dartmouth - Little Chance of Reconciliation
Benjamin Franklin and his son William chose different courses during the early stages of the American Revolution. The father chose to course of independence, William the course of reconciliation. The different choices led to a permanent rending of their once close relationship. On May 6, 1776 William wrote the British Secretary of State for the colonies, William Legge, the Earl of Dartmouth, that after the battles of Lexington and Concord, that there was little chance of reconciliation between the colonies and Britain.

Saturday, April 11, 2020

Sample Chapter - A Timeline of Indiana History - 1795 - 1800 - Moravians Approve Mission to the Delaware


Seal of the Indiana Territory
Sample Chapter 
Indiana’s Timeless Tales  - The Indiana Territory - Book 1
Moravians Approve Mission to the Delaware

August 15, 1800 - Moravians Approve Mission to the Delaware
In August 1800 the Moravians approved the mission to the Lenape that lived in the White River Region.
History of the Mission
The call to the Moravians to establish a mission among the Delaware had originated from an old Delaware Indian named Isaac. Isaac had been among the survivors of the Gnadenhutten Massacre, which had taken place in 1782.
Gnadenhutten Massacre
The Moravians had established three settlements in what is now southeaster Ohio along and in the region of the Muskingum River in 1772. These settlements were Gnadenhutten, Schoenbrunn and Salem. Many natives in this region listened to the Moravian missionaries, which had included Heckewelder and David Zeisburger, and converted to Christianity. During the Revolutionary War these peaceful natives, many of whom belonged to the Delaware tribe, stayed neutral in the war. The British had managed to recruit most of the other tribes to their cause. The British and the unconverted tribes distrusted the Moravian converts. The British removed the native residents of Gnadenhutten in 1781 and imprisoned them near Detroit. After removing them the British destroyed all the cabins and other improvements to the land that the natives had accomplished.  The British allowed about a hundred to return in the fall to harvest their crops. These Delaware resettled the town, however in March a band of Pennsylvania militia that had entered the area looking for Indians that had been conducting raids in that state found the Delaware. They mistook them for the Indians that had been raiding and murdered ninety-six Delaware in an incident that has become known as the Gnadenhutten Massacre on March 8, 1782.
Fled to Woapicamikunk 
Some of the survivors of Gnadenhutten fled to Woapicamikunk to live among other Delaware that had settled on the region. Some of these had reverted to the native beliefs of the Delaware, however some remained converted to Christianity. Isaac, now an old man, was one of these. Isaac had heard that David Zeisberger, who had founded the three missions in Ohio, had established another mission among the Indians at Goshen, Ohio in 1798. Isaac was too old to make the 16 day journey to Goshen, however he prevailed upon other tribal members to travel to Goshen and talk to the missionaries. Delaware Chief Tedpachxit decided to send a communication to the Moravians.
Tedpachxit
Historical lore indicates that Tedpachxit was a small man, however he was a proficient warrior. An incident that took place after St. Clair's massacre had Tedpachxit at an event in which several American officers were present. When one of the generals heard mention of Tedpachxit, he asked "who the devil is Tedpachxit," who thereupon strode over to the general and shook a string that had 27 dried human tongues strung on it and shook it in his face. Thus, he introduced himself to the general, saying, "He know me now." Tedpachxit had later been Christianized and had been a part of Zeisberger’ s mission in Ohio. Tedpachxit had led a band of Delaware into the region around the White River near what is now east central Indiana and established 6 towns. The largest town they called Woapicamikunk, or "Place of the Chestnut Trees." Tedpachxit, at Isaac's urging, sent a message to Zeisberger, at Goshen sometime in 1797.
Delegation
The Moravians sent a deputation to the village on the White River with the mission of finding out if the Lenape really wanted a Moravian mission. After their arrival they spoke with Tedpachxit and asked him if the Lenape were willing to host the missionaries. The Lenape chief Pachgantschihilas, also known as Buckongahelas, happened to be present. He inquired the source of the message. The members of the delegation told him that it was a member of their tribe that had formerly lived among the Moravians. Pachgantschihilas advised them to disregard the message, that if the Lenape had sent them a message, the messenger would be accompanied by a string of wampum. The delegation returned to the Moravians with this message. The Moravians at Goshen allowed the matter to rest.
Buckongahelas (c. 1720 – May 1805) 
Native to present day Delaware, Buckongahelas was also known as Pachgantschihilas and Petchnanalas. The name means "fulfiller" or "one who succeeds in all he undertakes." "fulfiller" or "one who succeeds in all he undertakes." Bu-kon-ge-he-las means "Giver of Presents." Pressure from white settlers forced the tribe to move west, some think to Buckhannon in Upshur County, West Virginia. Historical lore suggests that present day Buckhannon, West Virginia and the Buckhannon River's names derive from that of the Delaware Chief. During their sojourn in the area  Captain William White shot and killed  Buckongahelas' son, Mahonegon. A Boy Scout camp in the Buckhannon area bears the name of Mahonegon. At the beginning of the Revolutionary War Buckongahelas was associated with the Lenape chief White Eyes, who became allied with the Americans. Buckongahelas broke away and joined with Blue Jacket in the Ohio Country. During this time he visited with the Moravian Delaware, who had converted to Christianity, at Gnadenhütten, Ohio. During his visit he gave what John Heckeweller termed, a speech that was given "with ease and an eloquence not to be imitated." In the speech he warned the natives that the Americans would kill them if they got in their path and it would not matter if they were Christians. Eleven months after the speech, militia men from Pennsylvania did kill them in an incident known as the Gnadenhütten massacre in 1782. Buckongahelas was associated with Miami Chief Little Turtle and quite active during the Northwest Indian War and a member of the Northwest Indian Confederacy. He had participated in many raids against the settlers. He fought at St. Clair's Defeat and at the Battle of Fallen Timbers. Buckongahelas signed the Treaty of Greenville for the Lenape. He later moved his tribe into the area now known as Muncie, Indiana along the White River. He signed the 1803 Treaty of Fort Wayne and the 1804 Treaty of Vincennes. Buckongahelas died the following year, near Muncie, Indiana. A 650 pound bronze statue honors him at Buckhannon's Jawbone Run Park in Buckhannon, West Virginia.
Chief Hockingpomsga Visits Goshen
Lenape Chief Hockingpomsga visited Goshen on May 5, 1799. The Moravian missionaries were absent at the time of his visit, thus Lenape Chief William Henry Gelelemend spent time with the chief. During their activities Gelelemend mentioned that the respected Lenape Chief Netawatwes had been instrumental in bringing members of the various tribes into the mission established by the Moravians at Schoenbrunn Village, which was the first Moravian mission in what would become Ohio. Indeed, it had been Netawatwes that had initially invited the Moravians to establish a mission at the site and one of his fervent wishes was that the Lenape adopt the religion. Hockingpomsga was opposed to the missions, however respect for the venerated chief led him to carry the invitation to the Lenape to come to Goshen to hear the Word.
Chief Hockingpomsga 
The author has been unable to uncover much information about Chief Hockingpomsga other than that he lived in a village that bore his name, Hockingpomsga's Town. local historians believe that this village was on the banks of the White River near Priest Ford Road southwest of Yorktown, Indiana. Priest Ford Road connects Indiana State Road 32 with County Line Road 165 S.
Invitation Extended
In April 1800 a messenger, Tulpe Najundam, brought a message from the Lenape living along the White River extending an invitation for the Lenape living in Goshen to come and live with them in a large tract of land near their village of Woapicamikunk that they had available. The original message sent to the Lenape living along the White River had in no way indicated that the Goshen Lenape would consider moving away from their lands. Tulpe Najundam indicated that the chiefs had suspected that the Goshen Lenape would not wish to move, but had set aside the land any way in hopes that they would accept and move anyway.
Unwilling to Move
The Goshen Lenape were quite satisfied with their situation and were unwilling to move. The Moravian missionaries at Goshen knew this and had no illusions about the reasons for the chiefs of the White River Lenape to extend the invitations. It was rumored that many of the Christianized Lenape living along the White River wished to return to the missions in Ohio. The missionaries felt that the invitation, which the chiefs knew would include the missionaries, was to prevent any more Lenape from leaving the White River and to perhaps bolster the numbers of the tribe living in one area along the White River. In spite of this, the Moravians believed it was a tremendous opportunity to spread the Gospel among the Lenape. The sent a non committal answer to the White River Lenape, informing them that they were considering the offer, but that their leaders had the final say and that would take time.
Approval
Shortly after Tulpe Najundam's message to the Moravians, David Zeisberger dispatched a letter to the Moravian Helpers' Conference, which was the mission administerial board in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, urging them to approve the mission to the White River. He indicated that some of the Lenape families living in Goshen might be willing to relocate to Woapicamikunk. He suggested that the brethren should assign a married couple or a single brother take part in the mission.
Luckenbach and Kluge
In time, the brethren approved the mission and chose Abraham Luckenbach and John Peter Kluge to make the journey into the White River region to undertake the mission. Neither man was married, however Kluge had indicated that, if chosen, he would marry before going.

Sunday, April 5, 2020

Sample Chapter - Short History of Museums - Frederick Douglass National Historic Site


Sample Chapter 
Short History of Museums
 Frederick Douglass National Historic Site
Frederick Douglass (c.1818 - February 20, 1895)
Born into slavery on a plantation in Talbot County, Maryland, Douglas was the son of Harriet Bailey, a slave. She gave him the name, Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey. His owners wife, Sophia Auld, started teaching him to read and write, but had to stop under her husband's orders. He managed to continue learning to read and  write on his own. He escaped with the aid of a free black woman, Anna Murray in 1838, whom he later married. The couple settled in New Bedford, Massachusetts where he joined the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. The couple adopted the surname Douglass as their married name. Douglass became an ordained minister in 1839. He became well known for his oratory as he began traveling to abolitionist meetings. The American Anti-Slavery Society invited him to participate in their "Hundred Conventions" project. He accepted the invitation.
American Anti-Slavery Society
Founded in 1833 by abolitionists William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur Tappan, the Society became one of the leading anti-slavery organizations. Frederick Douglass became one of its leaders. The Society was controversial because of its views. Because slavery had become so enmeshed in the nation's economy, abolishing it would have major economic repercussions. Thus, their efforts to abolish it were often met with violence.
"100 conventions" 
The six month tour included speaking engagements throughout the Midwest and New England states. During this tour violence broke out frequently, as was the case at Pendleton, Indiana, where rioters almost killed Douglass.
Fall Creek Friends
The first Quakers, or Friends as they refer to themselves, migrated into the Pendleton area in 1833 when Jonathan Thomas visited the area. He went on to found the Fall Creek Friends. The society built the Fall Creek Meeting House in 1836. The Fall Creek Friends became active in the abolishion movement.
The Riot
The meeting was too large for the Meeting House to host, so the Friends had advertised to rent a building. None were offered, so the Friends elected to hold the event in a grove in an orchard near the falls of Falls Creek. Workers erected a platform and the crowd gathered. Not all were there to hear the speakers talk. During one of the speeches, violence broke out from a mob of about sixty men that had gathered. The mob attacked the speakers and Frederick Douglas landed on the ground. One attacker raised an iron bar to strike him on the head, but one of the Friends managed to shove Douglass to safety. The mob began throwing rocks as Douglass and the others ran. As they jumped over a rail fence, one rock struck Douglass, knocking him unconscious. A number of Friends grabbed him and helped him escape to a nearby farm house, where they cared for him. He suffered cuts to the face and head and a badly broken hand. the hand never healed properly, leaving him with an injury that would plague him the rest of his life.
Author
In the following years Douglass authored three books, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845),  My Bondage and My Freedom (1855) and Life and Times of Frederick Douglass published in 1892.
Travels to Europe
Douglass traveled to Europe in 1845 at the insistence of friends that feared his owners, attracted to his fame, would attempt to gain their property back. Douglass voyaged to England where he would stay for two years. During that time he traveled extensively in Ireland and England giving speeches. A fundraising effort by his supporters there raised enough money for them to purchase his freedom.
Abolitionist and Women's Suffrage
In 1847 he returned to the United States to reside in Rochester, New York. He started an abolitionist newsletter called the North Star with funds donated by his Irish and English supporters. He entered the arena of women's rights in 1848 when the attended the first women's rights convention, the Seneca Falls Convention.
Douglass would continue to deliver eloquent speeches and write in favor of emancipation for blacks and women's rights in the years before and after the Civil War. In 1874 he moved to Washington DC where he would live in a home overlooking the Anacostia River he would call Cedar Hill. Douglass passed away while attending a National Council of Women meeting on February 20, 1895. He is interred in Mount Hope Cemetery, near Rochester, New York.
Visitors to the site can experience educational seminars, see Douglass artifacts, photographs and documents.
Frederick Douglass National Historic Site
Mailing Address:
1411 W Street SE
Washington, DC 20020
(202) 426-5961
https://www.nps.gov/frdo/index.htm