Thursday, October 31, 2019

Sample Chapter - A Timeline of Indiana History - 1795 - 1800 April 1796 - Chillicothe Ohio Established

Sample Chapter
A Timeline of Indiana History - 1795 - 1800
April 1796 - Chillicothe Ohio Established
Located on the Scioto River, the site is situated in south central Ohio and was part of the Virginia Military District. The name Chillicothe derives from a Shawnee word Chala•ka•tha, which means "principal town." The Shawnee tribe moved to the site in 1758 after a flood destroyed their village of Shannoah, or Sonnontio, also on the Scioto River. After the Treaty of Greeneville the area was opened for white settlement and the Shawnee had to leave.
Nathanial Massie (December 28, 1763 - November 03, 1813)
The son of Nathaniel and Elizabeth Watkins Massie, Nathanial was native to Goochland County, Virginia. Nathaniel served in the Revolutionary War. In 1783 he migrated to Kentucky to farm land his father owned. Massie had studied surveying and began exploring lands north of the Ohio River in the Virginia Military District of the Northwest Territory.
Virginia Military District 
During the period when the United States was attempting to establish a national government Virginia controlled most of the land in the Ohio River Valley. Maryland refused to ratify the Articles of Confederation unless Virginia ceded this vast region to the Federal government. Virginia did cede the land, but kept a large tract located in what is now south central Ohio to use to pay its Revolutionary War Veterans.
Surveying the Land
Many of the Revolutionary War veterans hired him to survey lands they received as grants for their war service. In 1790 Massie surveyed Manchester, along the Ohio River. During his survey work, Massie selected the best lands and bartered them for his surveying work. Thus, Massie acquired significant land holdings in what would become Chillicothe and Ross County, Ohio. Massie placed advertisements in various Kentucky and Virginia newspaper. He offered free lots in the new town to the first 100 settlers that migrated with him to the Northwest Territory. By March 1796 he had attracted about forty men bent of settling in the newly opened lands.
Chillicothe
Massie led this group up the Scioto River to settle at a point where Paint Creek empties into the Scioto River on April 1. He named the new town Prairie Station.  This site proved unsuitable, as it was low lying and subject to flooding. Thus, the settlers moved further upstream to the site of the former Shawnee town and began clearing land for their new settlement. The pioneers called the new town Massieville; however Massie changed the name to Chillicothe. The original plat had 456 lots. By late in the year the new town had taverns, stores and tradesman's shops. The town would later become the capital of the Northwest Territory and then the first capital of the new state of Ohio. Massie would settle in the town. He is interred in Grandview Cemetery, Chillicothe in Ross County, Ohio.

Monday, October 28, 2019

Short History of Museums


Short History of Museums

Description:
Publishing Date to be Announced
Preview Chapter 1
Preview Chapter 2
Buy Direct from Author
Softbound Price - $

Other Books in the Series

Available In Multiple Formats - Ebook And Softbound:
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The Bookshelf
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Sample Chapter - Short History of Museums - Capitoline Museums

Sample Chapter 
Short History of Museums
Capitoline Museums

Pope Sixtus IV donated several bronze statues to the city of Rome in 1471, placing the collection on Capitoline Hill. The museum, still in existence and open to the public, claims the status of the oldest museum in the world. The collection of artifacts and art grew over the years to include ancient Roman statues, inscriptions, art, jewels and other historic artifacts. Pope Clement XII opened the museum to the public in 1734. The museum includes three main buildings linked by an underground gallery that passes under the piazza. Visitors will find a restaurant on the top level that provides a magnificent vista of Rome

Musei Capitolini
Piazza del Campidoglio 1
Capitoline Hill
00186 Roma.
Telephone +39 060608
http://www.museicapitolini.org/en/

Sunday, October 27, 2019

Greenwood Mall Book Show

Greenwood Mall Book Show
Greenwood Mall Book Show
1251 US-31 N
Greenwood, IN 46142
Saturday, November 30 - 9:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Sunday, December 1 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday, December 8 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday, December 15 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday, December 1 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday, December 1 8:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Sunday, December 29 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Indianapolis Christmas Gift and Hobby Show


Wednesday, November 6
Thursday November 7
Friday, November 8
Saturday, November 9 2019 
10:00 AM - 8:00 PM 
All three days
Indianapolis Christmas Gift and Hobby Show
Indiana State Fairgrounds
https://christmasgiftandhobbyshow.com

Some pics from the event









Thursday, October 17, 2019

Sample Chapter - Short History of Gardening and Agriculture - Steam Powered Farm Equipment

Sample Chapter 
Short History of Gardening and Agriculture 
Steam Powered Farm Equipment
Steam Engines
Thomas Aveling modified a Clayton & Shuttleworth portable steam engine in 1859, creating a self propelled machine that ranks as one of the world's first agricultural tractors. Aveling, and other tinkerers, experimented with the design of the machine over the next several years. By the beginning of the 1870's the shape of the tractor had been developed. The familiar four wheeled design remained dominant for the next several decades. These tractors packed a lot power for tasks like plowing and threshing wheat. The main drawbacks were that they were slow, heavy and hard to maneuver. The heavy machines frequently broke bridges down. They took a skilled operator as if improperly operated they would explode causing death and injury.
Thomas Aveling (September 11, 1824 - March 7, 1882)
The son of Thomas Aveling and Ann Aveling, Thomas was native to Fenland District, Cambridgeshire, Great Britain. His father died when he was young, after which the family migrated to Hoo. There his mother married Rev. John D'Urban. His father apprenticed him to a local farmer, Edward Lake. Aveling married D'Urban's daughter, Sarah. The couple would have six children. Aveling acquired a farm and operated a drainage tile business. In 1859 he modified a Clayton & Shuttleworth portable engine by attaching a long chain between he crankshaft of the engine and the rear axle. This machine became the nucleus of the traction engine that would evolve into the modern farm tractor. Many regard him as the "the father of the traction engine." He invented the steam roller and, along with Richard Thomas Porter founded the Aveling & Porter Company to manufacture steam rollers.
Threshing Machine
The threshing machine performed the work of the flail in threshing wheat. The mechanized thresher separated wheat grain from the straw and chaff in a series of steps. The farmer first fed the bundles of straw into a hopper on the machine. The bundles went into the separator, which was a series of rapidly rotating blades. These blades tore the bundle apart by cutting the twine that held them together and beat the grains from the heads without crushing the grains. The wheat then passed through a series of successively smaller screens that separated the straw and chaff from the wheat grain. The grain fell into a hopper where it was measured and dumped in a sack. The straw and chaff blew onto a nearby straw stack.
Threshing Rings
The mechanical thresher first appeared in 1837 when Hiram A. and John A. Pitts, Winthrop, Maine patented a horse powered threshing machine. This machine remained basically unchanged when steam powered engines first began appearing on farms around the beginning of the Twentieth Century. The threshing machine cost about $4,000 at this time, a substantial sum of money that was out of range of most farmers. Generally, a group of about six to eight farmers pooled their resources and purchased a machine. They would then pay for maintanence costs of the machine as a group. Each farm furnished a team of horses for each 40 acres to be threshed. After the threshing season concluded, the farmers held a meeting to settle accounts and lay plans for the next year.
The Women
While the men worked the threshing machines the women cooked and served the meals. Generally, the women began preparing for the day a week or so ahead of time. Other farm wives in the ring came to help out. On threshing day, the women served three meals, a morning and afternoon lunch and dinner at noon. The lunches consisted of meat and cheese sandwiches, cookies, and lemonade or water. Dinner was usually pan-fried chicken, beef and gravy, mashed potatoes, coleslaw, salads, sliced tomatoes, green beans, corn and other garden vegetables, relishes and pickles, bread or biscuits, along with pies, cakes and puddings. The reader must bear in mind that the quantity of food consumed by a band of hungry men was immense and the women worked without the benefit of air conditioning, refrigeration or modern cooking ranges. They had to carry water into the kitchen from the well in buckets and cook on either wood or coal cook stoves.
The Meals
When the women signaled that the food was ready, the steam engine operator blew the whistle on the steam engine, signaling that work would stop. The men washed their hands at the well or wash basins the women had placed nearby. The women generally brought the food into the fields, or alternately, in a spot near the barn. They women served the food on long tables made from planks. They used china, silverware and glasses. If the farm was large and required more than one day to thresh the grain, this process would repeat until it was done. Typically, the other wives in the ring would help wash the dishes and silverware. At the conclusion of the meal, the steam operator blew the whistle, signaling that work was to begin again.
Once one farm was done, the threshing crew moved to the next farm.

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Sample Chapter - An American Revolution Time Line - 1776 - Alexander Hamilton Writes Congress Demanding More Pay for his Troops

Sample Chapter
An American Revolution Time Line - 1776
May 02, 1776 - Alexander Hamilton Writes Congress Demanding More Pay for his Troops
Alexander Hamilton's artillery company was under staffed and underpaid. On May 2, Hamilton tried to rectify both situations by writing the New York Provincial Congress a letter in which he compared the pay rates of other artillery companies with his own. The letter stated:
“You will discover a considerable difference. My own pay will remain the same as it is now, but I make this application on behalf of the company, as I am fully convinced such a disadvantageous distinction will have a very pernicious effect on the minds and behavior of the men. They do the same duty with the other companies and think themselves entitled to the same pay.”
The Congress complied with his request. The number of enlisted men rose to 69 which was twice as many as he needed.

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Sample Chapter - A Timeline of Indiana History - 1795 - 1800 - August 07, 1795 – Greenville Treaty Copies Distributed

Sample Chapter
A Timeline of Indiana History - 1795 - 1800
August 07, 1795 – Greenville Treaty Copies Distributed
General Wayne opened the council by passing the calumet of peace to all the chiefs represented. After all had smoked, he passed copies of the treaty, along with the quill pen used by the chief to sign it, to each of the nations assembled. He instructed them to keep the "instrument of writing," and the copy of the treaty to pass along to their children, who would in turn pass it on to their children. He told them to keep in remembrance of the day the Fifteen Fires gave them peace and took them under its protection.
He next admonished them for two incidents that threatened to mar their good work. Someone had stolen the horse of a French trader that had accompanied them. Wayne told the chiefs that they must keep their young men under control. He informed them that a family of settlers that had thought they were safe during the negotiations had been murdered in their cabins the day before. He warned them that they must control themselves lest those seeking vengeance on the slain come into their territory and slay the wrong Indians in retribution.
The general next told them that gift distribution would begin the next day and would proceed in order of the tribes that signed the treaty. The Wyandotte had signed first, thus would receive their first. He assured them that it made no difference who received their gifts first; all would receive them as they became available.
Tarke next rose to praise those assembled for the good work they had concluded and to thank the Great Spirit for appointing this day.
After interpreters had translated Tarke’s speech to those assembled, the general concluded the session by distributing medals to each chief, commemorating the day and the treaty they had signed.
At this, the meeting adjourned.

Sunday, October 13, 2019

48th annual Holiday Bazaar - Batesville



48th annual Holiday Bazaar
November 3, 2019
10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Batesville, Indiana Primary School

I will have my books set up at the 48th annual Holiday Bazaar in Batesville, Indiana at the Batesville Primary School on Indiana State Road 46. 

Thursday, October 10, 2019

Sample Chapter - Short History of Indiana's Historic Markers - Atterbury Army Air Field

Sample Chapter
Short History of Indiana's Historic Markers 
Atterbury Army Air Field

Title of Marker:
Atterbury Army Air Field
Location:
In front of chapel at Middle Road and Grissom Avenue, Atterbury Army Air Field, Columbus (Bartholomew County, Indiana)
Installed by:
2007 Indiana Historical Bureau and Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum
Marker ID #: 
03.2007.2
Marker Text: 
Side one:
Construction begun summer 1942 under Captain Stratton O. Hammon, who used broad authority over laborers, suppliers, and railroad; base in use February 1943. More than 1, 000 workers employed during construction. Base was over 2, 000 acres, cost over four million dollars, and included more than one hundred buildings, intended to be temporary.
Side two:
WW II uses included training B-25, B-26, and glider pilots; by 1944, wounded from Europe received here for Wakeman Hospital. Wounded soldiers during Korean War received here. Renamed 1954 to honor Lt. John Bakalar. Base closed 1970. Original building made into chapel; restored and named for Women's Air Service Pilot Jean Lewellen Norbeck 1990s.

Short History by the Author
The task of organizing the mammoth task of constructing the airfields needed to train 70,000 pilots annually fell to General of the Army and General of the Air Force Henry Harley "Hap" Arnold. He moved the responsibility of building air bases from the overburdened Quartermaster Corps to the U. S. Army Corps of Engineer. The Army had no plan for any of the bases, only a set of guidelines that followed General Arnold's concept of "Spartan" simplicity for the bases. There would be no frills or creature comforts at these bases. The buildings would be simple lumber and tar paper construction. These buildings were quite cold in winter and hot in summer. The hangers were of wood or concrete. The guidelines called for one secure hanger to hide the Norden bomb sight, which was top-secret. Atterbury's construction followed these guidelines during its construction. The United States, in the face of major war, needed a lot of air bases and it needed them fast. The site that Atterbury would occupy had been open corn fields. This land needed to be turned into a United States Army Air Field as quickly as possible.
The Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum preserves the memory and history of this airfield. Located on site, the museum is a treasure trove of memorabilia, history and exhibits covering the Atterbury Army Air Field and Bakalar Air Base. For more information, contact:


Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum
4742 Ray Boll Boulevard
Columbus, Indiana 47203
812-372-4356
abmuseum@att.net
http://www.atterburybakalarairmuseum.org/

Sample Chapter - Short History of Rivers, Streams and Lakes - Connecticut River

Sample Chapter
Short History of Rivers, Streams and Lakes
Connecticut River

Connecticut derives from the Mohegan Indian tribe’s word, quinetucket, which means “beside the long, tidal river." The 406 miles river flows through four states and is New England's longest river. Its source is in the Fourth Connecticut Lake near the Canadian border in New Hampshire.  During its course generally southwest, it feeds the Third, Second and First Connecticut Lakes. After its next destination, Lake Charles, it continues southwest until it reaches Stewartstown, New Hampshire, where it turns south to form the border between Vermont and New Hampshire. The White River joins it at White River, Vermont a few miles south of the Dartmouth College campus. Another major tributary, the West River, joins it at Brattleboro, Vermont. The Connecticut enters Massachusetts about ten miles south of this junction. It leaves Massachusetts a few miles south of Springfield Massachusetts and enters Connecticut. After passing through Hartford, the river enters the Atlantic Ocean south of Old Lyme, Connecticut.  27 towns in Vermont and 26 in New Hampshire border the river.
History
The broad fertile valley of the river drew several native tribes to its soils before European settlement. These tribes included the Pequots, Mohegan, Mattabesset and the Pocomtuc.
The Dutch
Dutch explorer Adriane Block is the first recorded European explorer to penetrate the Connecticut in 1614. Calling it the "Fresh River, he claimed it for the Dutch as part of the New Netherlands colony. The Dutch constructed Fort Huys de Hoop in 1623 at the current site of Hartford, Connecticut.
The Puritans
Puritan groups from the Plymouth colony began settling along the river beginning in 1635. The main settlements were Hartford, Springfield, Matianuck (now Windsor, Connecticut) and Wethersfield. Another Puritan group out of Cambridge, Massachusetts established Agawam Plantation, now Springfield, Massachusetts. The growing strength of the English colonies forced the Dutch out in 1664.
Industry
Colonists continued to flow into the area and many industries developed. Farms, gristmills and other industries developed. Sometime around 1865 logging drives of trees cut near the Third Connecticut Lake flowed downriver to saw mills in Wilder and Bellows Falls, Vermont. Thirteen dams along the river provide water and recreation for many of the residents that leave nearby.

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Short History of Fire Fighting - Indiana Edition





Description
Publication Date to be Announced


Preview Chapter
Buy Direct from Author
Softbound Price - $

Other Books in the Series
Short History of Libraries, Printing and Language - Indiana Edition
Short History of Fire Fighting - Indiana Edition


Available In Multiple Formats - Ebook And Softbound:
Draft to Digital Universal Link
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Playster
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble - Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Scribid
24 Symbols
Walmart Books
Apple


The Bookshelf
101 N Walnut St,
Batesville, IN 47006

(812) 934-5800
bookshelf101@hotmail.com
Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
Mossyfeetbooks@gmail.com
Orders over $50.00 Free Shipping
Join Paul Wonning on:
Facebook
Twitter
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YouTube
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Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Scribd Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Apple
Paul Wonning's Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble
Paul Wonning's Books on 24 Symbols
Paul Wonning's Books on Google Play
Paul Wonning's Books on Indigo
Paul Wonning's Books on Playster
Paul Wonning's Books on OverDrive
Search Paul Wonning on Ingrams
© 2019 Paul Wonning

Sample Chapter - Short History of Fire Fighting - Indiana Edition - McCormick's Creek Fire Tower

Sample Chapter
Short History of Fire Fighting - Indiana Edition
McCormick's Creek Fire Tower
Used as an active fire tower from its construction in 1935 until 1967, the McCormick's Creek Fire Tower now serves as a popular observation site for park visitors. Constructed by CCC Company #589, the tower is located on Trail 4 near the Park Office. The elevation of the land the tower sits in is 770 feet  above sea level. The eighty-six foot tall tower's lookout cab measures seven feet along each wall with windows containing nine panes on each wall. The National Historic Lookout Register registered the tower on November 12, 2008. The tower underwent an extensive renovation in 2017. The park has opened the tower to the public.  

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Preview Chapter - Short History of Gardening and Agriculture - Reaping Grain



Preview Chapter
Short History of Gardening and Agriculture
Reaping Grain 
Cradle Reaper
Also called the cradle scythe or grain cradle, this implement was an adaptation of the scythe. Developed sometime before 1800, the cradle reaper began to see widespread use between 1800 and 1840 in the United States. The cradle reaper consisted of a set of wooden finger shaped spokes attached to the handle of the scythe. The purpose was to catch the stalks of grain and keep them aligned when cut, to make it easier to tie the cut grain into shocks. The McCormick Mechanical Reaper eventually replaced it.
Mechanical Reaper
Several inventors toyed with devising a mechanical reaper during the Nineteenth Century, however it was Robert McCormick that first came up with a design for a working reaper in 1831. He was unable to perfect the device, so he asked his son John to improve it.